HOTSHOTS – David Sisi (London Irish)

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first_imgSisi is also in his first season with the England U18 squad, and Academy coach John Fletcher says: “He did well in his senior debut, and is definitely one to watch in future.”RUGBY WORLD VERDICT: LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: London Irish Up and comer David SisiSt Paul’s Catholic College pupil David Sisi first picked up a rugby ball as a Year Seven student, and played his first few years in the front row.He has since played in the second row, and is now settling down in the back row, where he hopes to stay. One of his rugby heroes is Lawrence Dallaglio, and Sisi’s explosive running and ball-carrying is reminiscent of the former England captain. “He was such a powerful runner,” says Sisi, 6ft 2in and 18st 9lb. “And the fact that he played sevens shows what an incredible work-rate he had.”Currently on London Irish’s AASE scheme, which targets school leavers who have the potential to play elite rugby, Sisi became the club’s youngest-ever debutant when he came off the bench aged 17 in the LV= Cup game against Sale Sharks in November. Although Irish lost 39-14, Sisi was pleased with his performance.“The pace and physicality of the game was definitely a step up from the A League,” he says, “but I got good feedback from the coaches after the game and was pleased with my stats.”Giselle Mather, AASE manager at London Irish, says of Sisi: “He’s worked incredibly hard and is very dedicated and motivated. He’s changed his whole lifestyle and is very promising at six or eight.” With natural talent and a fantastic work ethic, Sisi deserves to go far.Bea Aspreylast_img read more

Wheelchair Rugby’s still buzzing after a successful summer

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first_imgAustralia’s Ryley Batt celebrates at the final whistle of the Gold medal Wheelchair Rugby match between Canada and Australia at the Basketball Arena during the London 2012 Paralympic Games in the Olympic Park in east London on September 9, 2012. Australia won the game 66-51. AFP PHOTO / ADRIAN DENNIS (Photo credit should read ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/GettyImages) Check out Australia’s road to Gold at London 2012… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS GB’s placing of fifth at the Games was an underachievement for them and as soon as they realised a medal was out of their grasp when they lost their final pool game to Japan, their focus immediately, and rightly, switched to development for Rio 2016. Players competing in their first Paralympics such as Aaron Phipps, Dave Anthony and Steve Brown were given lots of court time and played well to ensure the team maintained their fifth-place world ranking.Away from the spotlight, a development squad has been meeting regularly and training hard; and work towards the next Paralympics begins in earnest next month as for the first time a GB development team will be taken to an international tournament – Rugbymania in Prague.The team that coaches Justin Frishberg and Paul Shaw includes players who have been on the fringes for a while, such as Neville Burrell, and new players ready to get themselves noticed including Chris Ryan and Luke White. While Rio is a long way off, they’ll get the chance to make an early impact against the best players in Europe before hopefully progressing to facing tougher opposition from further afield.The popularity of the sport in this country has been marked by the introduction of three new club teams this season: Caledonian Crushers in Scotland, West Country Hawks in Plymouth and West Coast Crash 2, allowing a second division to be created. This is makes the sport more accessible than ever and, if it continues, the influx of players over the next four years could cause a few headaches for the Rio 2016 selectors, which is no bad thing.This blog intends to keep you up to date with the world of rugby’s disability equivalent – I’ll report back soon with news on how GB fared in Prague. Wish them luck! Hard hitting: Japan’s Kauhiko Kanno tips over during a London 2012 matcha against USABy Alison Couldridge“WHEELCHAIR RUGBY is the glamour sport, and we’re the rock stars,” said GB wheelchair rugby player Myles Pearson soon after entering the Paralympic Village.His tongue may have been in his cheek, but he was certainly proved right once the tournament started. Thousands of sports fans queued outside the basketball arena at the Olympic Park for hours to ensure they caught Great Britain’s opening game against USA. And many were left disappointed as they were turned away once the arena had quickly filled up; a routine which became familiar as every subsequent game was a sell-out.There were stories of people sprinting to the turnstiles once the ‘tickets available’ sign flashed up on the screen next to the arena, whether GB were playing or not. As sport information specialist for the Paralympic News Service at the games, I saw first-hand how popular it was and it’s something I want to help continue, which is what this blog is about. The prospect of watching the likes of Australia’s Ryley Batt bulldoze his way through every defence put in front of him to get to the gold medal was clearly one which had to be seen to be believed.Minesweeper: Australia’s Ryley BattEven Riadh Sallem from tournament minnows France was mobbed while wandering around Olympic Park, even at midnight when he was spied having one celebratory beer for his birthday after proving himself as another one of the sport’s hard men.It’s been less than two months since the London 2012 closing ceremony and wheelchair rugby players all over the world, medal winners or not, have been riding the wave competing in a Paralympic Games creates.The Canadian team, who won silver, has had its success recognised by being nominated for the Canadian Sport Awards Team of the Year trophy, bronze medallist Chuck Aoki from team USA was photographed fist-bumping President Barack Obama at the White House and everyone in Batt’s home town of Port Macquarie, New South Wales and beyond wants to hear his story.Any sport that gains so much momentum so quickly deserves to be built upon. It’s an excellent spectator sport that can literally give people a new lease of life. Just ask GB players Andy Barrow and Ross Morrison, who sustained spinal cord injuries while playing rugby union.last_img read more

30 Minutes with… Joe Marler

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first_img Food for thought: Joe Marler gives us an insight into his personality The England front-rower on pastries, panic attacks and parenting RUGBY WORLD: Who are the jokers in the England squad?JOE MARLER: Manu (Tuilagi) is silent but deadly. And cheeky little Danny Care.RW: Can you tell us about any pranks?JM: No! I’m not allowed to disclose info like that.RW: Who’d play you in a film of your life?JM: I would. I’m quite good at ‘am dram’ and I’d like to think I could make the step up.RW: Do you have any nicknames?JM: Croissant, because the boys think I have a nose that looks like a French pastry. And Quasi Marler, you can guess why.RW: How are you finding fatherhood?JM: I don’t suppose you get graded on it? But, it’s the best job in the world. The pay could be better, mind you.I get a bit less sleep and have less money, but my partner Daisy does most of the work. My son Jasper is seven months; he’s crawling around, getting fat. He’s taken after his m… no, his dad!RW: What three things would you take to a desert island?JM: Rufio, my dog. I’ve got two black labradors. Kozie, the other one, is nine now and she’s had a good innings, so I wouldn’t take her.I’d take Jasper, too. He’d be a good laugh. And a kitchen knife.RW: Who’d be your three dream dinner party guests – alive or dead?JM: Just Nelson Mandela (above with Jake White and John Smit after South Africa’s RWC 2007 win), because I do a good impression and I’d want his opinion. But I don’t like people, so there wouldn’t be a dinner party. I’d just call him and get him to listen to my impression.RW: What’s your favourite cheat meal?JM: Every meal’s a cheat meal, look at this figure! No, I like a Chinese takeaway. This is making me hungry.RW: What’s been your silliest purchase?JM: Loads of different door knobs, for the cupboards in our house. They were ridiculously expensive and they’re just door knobs.RW: Does Daisy wear the trousers?JM: Sometimes. Sometimes skirts, sometimes shorts… JM: I’m not bothered. I do care what people think of me, but only the people that matter.This interview was published in the December 2014 edition of Rugby World. Click here for the latest subscription offers.center_img RW: Do you have any superstitious?JM: I used to walk out of the changing room last, but that’s ended this season. It wasn’t a very good superstition.RW: Do you have any hidden talents?JM: Lots, all rude.RW: What are your phobias?JM: I’m claustrophobic. I went for an MRI scan on my shoulder and it lasted 30 seconds before I pressed the buzzer and had a panic attack. I was sent to London to the fat person’s extra large scanner, which was okay.RW: What’s been your best holiday?JM: Kefalonia, our first family holiday. Jasper was good as gold; he’s been a dream.RW: If you could have one superpower what would it be and why?JM: To fly, to go back to that desert island.RW: What would you like to achieve outside of rugby?JM: To be a good dad. Family comes first – everything revolves around that. We’ll probably have more children, more dogs, more ducks… we’ll be living on an ark by the end of it.RW: Which of your team-mates would you like to be?JM: None of them.RW: What last made you laugh?JM: George Robson falling over in the tunnel at Toulon.RW: It was ages ago!JM: But I watch it on YouTube every week!RW: How’d you like to be remembered? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

For the love of the game: on the road with Richmond Women

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first_imgCrowd pleaser: more action right in front of the spectators (pic by Tim Nunan)“For Darlington Mowden Park Sharks, (Richmond’s furthest away game) we meet in Richmond at 6 o’clock in the morning. So I’ll leave Essex at around four, go to Richmond, get the bus, play and then get home at about one in the morning.”For us mere mortals this devoted relationship with the motorway might seem alien. But for the top women’s teams in the country there simply isn’t another option. McCarthy tells me many of the players she knows would go professional given the opportunity. As for why they’re willing to do all of this in their evenings and on their days off: “They’re your family. Whatever’s happened outside of rugby they’ll be there for you, which makes getting up that early and doing all that work worth it.”Last act: Both sides pose for a photograph at the game’s close (pic by Tim Nunan)This is the last season of the Women’s Premiership as we know it. From next term onwards there will be ten teams competing in an all-new competition, Women’s Super Rugby, with the league ring-fenced for two seasons. Lichfield, who won the fixture here, have not been offered a place in the new competition but Richmond will participate and the RFU’s aim is to raise the standards of domestic women’s rugby. For the majority of athletes it will still be a case of amateurs going to extraordinary lengths to enjoy the sport they love. Fizzing out a pass: Jade Wong feeds the Richmond back-line (pic by Tim Nunan) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Find out what happened when Rugby World joined Richmond Women for their last league game of the season, away to Lichfieldcenter_img By Rachel KingHow far would you go for rugby? Every weekend up and down the country thousands of players, supporters and fans pack themselves into cars, coaches and trains. But for some these trips are less of a jaunt and more of a lifestyle. Rugby World joined Richmond Women on a trip to Lichfield for their last league match of the season to see what it really means to travel for the love of the game.We set off from Richmond Athletic Ground at midday for a 5pm kick-off, and most of the team are napping or stocking up on food. The journey there is defined by coffee – gallons and gallons of coffee. Oh and Ryan Gosling. Our fancy coach has two large TV’s which drop down from the ceiling and we’re watching Remember the Titans. A very young Gosling is part of the first racially-integrated high school American Football team in Virginia. It’s not his most memorable performance, but he’s popular with the team and the film contains enough of an aggressive contact sport to still be rousing. As for the trip back I’m afraid I can’t talk about it: I took an oath.Full throttle: A big collision during the final regular season game (pic by Tim Nunan)Richmond lost 48-0 in the early-evening sunlight, but their spirits are still high. On the round trip we spend six hours on the road. But, as No 8 and full-time physio Sam McCarthy points out, six hours being driven on a coach is not actually something to be taken for granted. “For a lot of the Women’s Premiership clubs it’s still a relatively new thing,” she says. “They used to have to do a four-hour drive, then play rugby and then drive back, which is a lot.“For the men’s Premiership it’s the same, they still have to travel, they still have to train, but obviously they don’t have to work 40 hours (of a day job) on top of it.”For the team, though, this time commitment is all part and parcel of being a Premiership player. Richmond captain and ex-England hooker Emma Croker commutes to training and home games from Essex, a 90-minute drive on a good day. “I work in West London so I’ll go straight to training from there, which is time when I don’t get to go back and see my daughter,” she says. “Then it takes the whole day on a Sunday between travelling and playing and travelling home again. For the top women’s teams in this country travel is as much a fact of their rugby lives as training or nutrition. The difference is they do it in their spare time. They’ll get up at four and get back at midnight for big matches, commute an hour to training after work and back again, spend all that time away from their families, away from their jobs, trekking up and down the country because they love this sport so much. It’s not all bad though – sometimes you get to see Ryan Gosling in Lycra.Crabbie’s is a club partner of Richmond Rugby. For more information on how Crabbie’s is supporting grass-roots clubs across the UK via its Rugby Rewards scheme and how your club can get involved, go to www.crabbiesrugby.co.uk Find out more about the Women’s Super Rugby competition in the May 2017 issue of Rugby World – on sale Tuesday 4 April.last_img read more

The Best and Worst England Kits

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first_imgThoughts on @EnglandRugby and their new kit deal with @UmbroUK?! pic.twitter.com/L1Xhot08Qu— Andy Goode (@AndyGoode10) May 5, 2020Regardless, with this news doing the rounds on social media, and many people posting pictures of what the leaked kit may look like, we decided to look at some of the best and worst England kits from years gone by.The BestCentenaryLots of you picked out this kit which England wore to celebrate 100 years of international fixtures at Twickenham, the first of which was a match between England and Wales in 1910.In 2010 England again played Wales and were victorious 30-17.2003 World CupPretty unflashy in its design but England won their sole World Cup in it so it has to be one of the best right?Black (2011 World Cup)Sure, England are supposed to wear white and the All Blacks seem to have a monopoly on the colour, but England’s black kit during the 2011 World Cup actually looked good, unlike some of the kits below… 2012 wasn’t a great year for England kits. The purple kit Robshaw is wearing above was roundly criticised and this design for the England Sevens teams wasn’t much better.For more news from the world of rugby, do not forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. We take a look at some of the best and worst kits to have been worn by England. The WorstPurple (2009)England’s first foray into the colour purple may have proved surprisingly popular at the time, but in hindsight, it really isn’t great…2007 World CupWhen we took to Twitter to ask for your suggestions this red and white design was regularly cited as one of the worst. Although the memory of England losing the 2007 Rugby World Cup Final may have something to do with that.Purple (2012)This kit regularly features highly when people are asked about the worst England rugby kits ever.Space Invader Homage?Admittedly this is an England Sevens kit, but we aren’t really sure what kind of design Canterbury were going for here…England Sevens (2012)center_img The Best and Worst England KitsEngland have recently signed a new kit contract with Umbro switching away from Canterbury.Umbro will take over as the official England rugby kit manufacturer after the 2020 Six Nations concludes, but with the Coronavirus still limiting all sport and rugby, it is unclear when this will be.Recently Sam Underhill and Tom Curry were spotted in some Umbro apparel which proved quite decisive online, although it should be acknowledged that it is almost certainly training kit and not the match day uniform. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Spring Sale: 5 issues of Rugby World magazine for just £5

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first_img Spring Sale: 5 issues of Rugby World magazine for just £5We have something to put a spring in your step – an incredible Rugby World subscription deal. Subscribe to Rugby World magazine right now and receive five issues for just £5.Or if you’re outside the UK, you can get five issues for $5 or €5, depending where you live. This Spring Sale is global!Get 5 issues of Rugby World magazine for just £5So if you want to find out more about rugby’s biggest names, know the story behind the news and see the game’s big issues dissected and debated take out a subscription to Rugby World magazine, which brings you all this and more.By taking out a subscription, you’ll never miss an issue and get the magazine delivered to your door every month. Plus, you get all this brilliant content…Exclusive player accessRugby World magazine takes you closer to the game’s biggest stars than ever before with our exclusive interviews. Our journalists get the players’ views on the major issues in rugby and find out what drives them to succeed as well as what makes them tick off the pitch.We bring you the detail you want to know, be that discovering how players are improving their game or taking to the skies with those who also have pilot’s licences.Behind-the-scenes insight Then it’s only £29.49 every six months when you take out a subscription LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Readers get the detail they crave as we go behind the scenes to get the inside story on what goes on in the team environment. We also have technical insight from coach Sean Holley, who analyses teams and players as well as providing advice on what your club could do.Professional players offer tips on specific facets of the game that you can employ, too, while ‘The Secret Player’ gives eye-opening detail on life as a pro.Hard-hitting opinionWith myriad talking points in the sport, Rugby World delivers the story behind the news. Our comprehensive investigations highlight all sides of the big issues and top-quality columnists like Stuart Barnes, Stephen Jones and Mark Evans give their verdict on rugby’s hot topics, from the salary cap to selection. We also provide a platform for players and readers to share their opinions on the latest happenings in the game.Here are all the details on the five issues of Rugby World for £5 Spring Sale offer.Once the trial period is over, the subscription is just £29.49 every six months and you can cancel online at any time. This offer is available to new subscribers and runs until 10am on Monday 3 May 2021. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Dioceses respond to marriage equality decision by US Supreme Court

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first_img John M Stevenson says: By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 10, 2014 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI [Episcopal News Service] Episcopalians in many dioceses across the church have been considering how to respond to Monday’s U.S. Supreme Court action clearing the way for same-sex marriage to start in Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin.The court let stand appeals court rulings in three U.S. federal court districts which had overturned bans on same-sex marriage in those states. While it was predicted that access to same-sex marriage could soon be extended to six other states in those circuits, the situation is far from settled, with confusion at even the highest level.Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy mistakenly blocked the start of same-sex marriage in Nevada in an order that spawned confusion among state officials and disappointment in couples hoping to be wed, the Associated Press reported Oct. 10. Due to the confusion, AP reported that 30 states, “give or take a few,” currently allow same-sex marriage.Meanwhile, the issue of how the Episcopal Church ought to respond to the changing legal map across the United States is due to be discussed at the 78th meeting of General Convention in July 2015.The A050 Task Force on the Study of Marriage recently issued a report on its work to date, saying that it was finalizing its report to convention, including considering a response to its mandate to “address the pastoral need for priests to officiate at a civil marriage of a same-sex couple.”The task force was formed in response to a call (via Resolution A050 (click on “current version”)) from the 77th General Convention in July 2012 for a group of “theologians, liturgists, pastors and educators to identify and explore biblical, theological, historical, liturgical and canonical dimensions of marriage.That same meeting of convention authorized provisional use of a rite to bless same-sex relationships. Use of that rite, Liturgical Resources I: I Will Bless You and You Will Be A Blessing, is due to be reviewed by the General Convention in 2015.Here is a state-by-state look at the diocesan responses thus far in the five jurisdictions immediately affected by the Supreme Court’s decision:IndianaIn the Diocese of Indianapolis Bishop Catherine Waynick wrote to clergy on Oct. 10 saying that her previous policy of allowing priests to bless same-sex relationships would now apply in those Indiana counties that are granting marriage licenses to such couples.She also encouraged any diocesan parish that has not yet provided a study of the issue for its members to arrange to do so during the coming year. “Whether or not there are any same gender couples in the congregation, whether or not a priest feels able to preside, same gender marriage is now a legal reality, and the Church as a whole can benefit from reflection on the meaning of marriage, how the provisional rite meets the needs of same gender couples (or not) and what is at stake when decisions about same gender celebrations are made,” she said.Her letter to clergy is posted on the front page of the diocesan website.Since September 2012, Waynick has allowed the blessing of same-sex relationships on a case-by-case basis, as have her predecessors over the last 20 years. She approved diocesan use of the General Convention provisional rite in 2012. Waynick also laid out conditions for its optional use in the diocese.Information about Indianapolis’ approach to same-sex blessings is here.When the federal appeals court overturned the state’s ban on same-sex marriage, Diocese of Northern Indiana Bishop Edward Little asked clergy in that diocese to decline any requests they received to solemnize such marriages because the Book of Common Prayer defines marriage as the union of husband and wife and because “our liturgical and constitutional understanding of marriage remains unchanged,” he told Episcopal News Service via e-mail.“The policy articulated in that letter remains in place,” he said.OklahomaWhen the Diocese of Oklahoma went through a discernment process in 2012 and 2013 that resulted in Bishop Edward J. Konieczny authorizing use of the General Convention provisional rite in that diocese, it was agreed that if and when the law changed in Oklahoma with regard to marriage, the diocese “would once again be deliberate in our discernment of how to move forward,” Konieczny told ENS via e-mail. He reported that that conversation began Oct. 7 during the diocese’s annual clergy conference.Information about Oklahoma’s approach is here.UtahSame-sex blessings have been allowed in the Diocese of Utah since Advent 2012. Details of that policy are here.Bishop Scott Hayashi told diocesan clergy after the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling that he would soon issue a new policy allowing priests to solemnize same-sex marriages. In an e-mail advance of issuing that policy, Hayashi asked priests to amend the church’s provisional rite to declare couples united “in marriage according to the laws of the State of Utah.”Meanwhile he told clergy that “because we live in a web of relationships it is very important that we proceed forward with care for all people regardless of their opinion in this matter.”“Remember also that The Episcopal Church has not yet decided on the matter of same-sex marriage,” he added. “That will most likely happen at the 78th General Convention here in Utah. Until then, we have been given the option of the ‘generous pastoral response’.”And, in a statement on the diocesan website, the bishop acknowledged that not all would be happy with the court’s decision. Hayashi attended the Mormon Church’s General Conference the weekend before the court’s decision and he reported that Dallin H. Oaks, one of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, told the assembly that the church may come out on the losing side of the same-sex marriage debate. He advised church members to “accept unfavorable results graciously, and practice civility with our adversaries.”Hayashi said he plans to exercise Oaks’ advice and will “practice not only civility but also compassion.”VirginiaShortly after the Supreme Court’s ruling, Bishop Shannon Johnston issued guidelines saying priests in the diocese may officiate at the civil marriage of a same sex couple as a “generous pastoral response” to lesbian and gay couples seeking to be married, and may bless their civil marriage.Johnston said priests should use the General Convention rite and, at the pronouncement, should add the words “according to the laws of the Commonwealth of Virginia” where appropriate.He expressly said that the Book of Common Prayer’s Celebration and Blessing of a Marriage rite may not be used because the church has not yet changed its canonical definition of marriage of that between a man and a woman.Diocese of Southwestern Virginia Bishop Mark A. Bourlakas told Episcopal News Service Oct. 10 in a telephone interview that “it’s a priority for me that our three dioceses are on the same page [on policies towards same-sex marriage] and therefore our policy will look almost identical in every substantive way” as Virginia’s.The policy has not yet been formally adopted but Bourlakas said he thinks Virginia has taken a “measured approach and not inconsistent with where we’ve already been” on the issue.For Bourlakas the wider c0ncern prompted by the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision is that the Episcopal Church is still talking about how to respond and that the conversation must continue within the church.“My hope is that parishes and clergy will have conversations about their common life and seek understanding; that is what I want to promote in this diocese,” he said. “One of my really strong messages, coming out of our Baptismal Covenant to respect the dignity of every human being, is that we begin by listening and trying to seek understanding, and we don’t begin with our prejudices. And that can lead us in a variety of directions but oftentimes I think in these discussions we start with people already in their corners.”Clergy in the diocese have been able to bless same-sex couples, using the convention provisional rite, since  Bourlakas’ consecration in July 2013.His policy on same-sex blessings is here.In the Diocese of Southern Virginia, Bishop Herman Hollerith is on sabbatical until November and was not available to comment on the impact of the court’s decision on policies in that diocese. However, Bourlakas said Oct. 10 that Hollerith told him that day that Southern Virginia’s policy will be similar to those of Virginia and Southwestern Virginia for consistency’s sake as the Episcopal Church continues its conversation about same-sex marriage as it approaches the 2015 meeting of General Convention.Hollerith authorized the use of the General Convention blessing rite as of January 2013. The details of that policy and related resources are here.WisconsinDiocese of Milwaukee Bishop Steven Miller told his clergy on Oct. 8 that the Episcopal Church is “still involved in a discussion relative to the theology of marriage” and that the Supreme Court’s decision did not change either the church’s canons or rubrics on marriage. The provisional rite approved by the General Convention in 2012 is not a marriage liturgy, he noted, “therefore it is inappropriate for clergy of this Church to act as agents of the State and sign marriage licenses for same-sex couples.”Miller had announced in late August that he would allow clergy to bless same-sex couples who had been married civilly. Priests must use a modified rite that Miller has authorized. His response came after the diocesan Standing Committee sent him a report recommending that he allow clergy the option to bless same-sex relationships.The bishop, who signed an amicus brief that supported overturning Wisconsin’s ban on same-sex marriage, objected to the convention’s rite because he said it creates a “second class of citizens in the church” who cannot marry, creates injustice for those who “would suffer dire economic consequences” if they married, obscures the church’s teaching that the place for sexual intimacy is marriage and assumes that previous convention action has all been on one side of the issue.Miller’s policy on same-sex blessings is here.Diocese of Eau Claire Bishop William Lambert and Diocese of Fond du Lac Bishop Matt Gunter did not respond to ENS’ request for information about their positions.Same-sex blessings have not been officially allowed in Fond du Lac. As a nominee for bishop, Gunter said in reply to a question from the bishop search committee earlier this year that the church “must decide for itself what is faithful” regardless of the law in the state but that if same-sex marriage did become legal in Wisconsin, “there will be new urgency for the diocese to deal with its divisions” on the issue.To meet that urgency, he said, “I would lead the diocese through open conversation along with biblical and theological reflection on the issue itself.”“And then, assuming division remains, what does it look like to live together in spite of those divisions and what decisions can be made by the diocese such that its faith and discipline are clear even while acknowledging a faithful ‘minority report’?— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC October 10, 2014 at 4:42 pm I wonder how much longer The Episcopal Church will “dilly dally” and waste time (which could be better spent spreading the Gospel) before deciding same sex couples with state issued marrage licenses may be married in the church. Rector Shreveport, LA Comments are closed. Curate Diocese of Nebraska October 17, 2014 at 4:48 pm As if current knowledge of the sciences were as in 2,000 – 6,000+ (?) years ago. World is not static. Context is everything. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 October 19, 2014 at 8:42 am Hebrews 13:8English Standard Version (ESV)8 Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY January 17, 2015 at 12:08 pm The first issue for me personal is the separation of Church & State. Why not begin that discussion and separate. This alone would move a big step forward in the 21st Century.My personal thought is, how can I withhold God’s Blessing from any human being. Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA General Convention 2012, An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Doug Desper says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL David Littler says: Same-Sex Marriage Comments (6) TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Dioceses respond to marriage equality decision by US Supreme Court General Convention, Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books October 12, 2014 at 7:34 pm Matthew 19: 4 He answered, “Have you not read that the one who made them at the beginning ‘made them male and female,’ 5 and said, ‘For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh’? 6 So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let no one separate.” Jesus’ words on marriage (as He reiterates the design for human relations in Genesis 2) seems to be absolutely clear. We had better get this one right. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Same-Sex Blessings, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis G Miller says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group October 15, 2014 at 6:16 am When will Christians, who say God is Love, finally stand up for love? When will Christians finally end discrimination based on anatomy? To say love is not love is unethical! Please deliver usfrom hate done in the name of Lovefrom exclusion done in the name of Truthfrom abuse done in the name of Kindnessand from injustice done in the name of The-Time-Is-Not-Yet-Rightamen The Rve Gilbert H. Watkins says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Rowan Orre says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Faith & Politics, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Human Sexuality, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Marriage Equality, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NClast_img read more

Una vida santa: Hiram Hisanori Kano convirtió el campo de…

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first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Las memorias del Rdo. Hiram Hisanori Kano, Nikkei Farmer on the Nebraska Plains, se publicaron en inglés en 2010.El obispo Scott Hayashi, de Utah, presidió la eucaristía en que se le rindió tributo a Kano, que murió en 1988, a muy poco de cumplir cien años. El 24 de octubre será el día oficial para la conmemoración de Kano, quien escribió Nikkei Farmer on the Nebraska Plains [Un granjero nikeí en las llanuras de Nebraska], unas memorias que recorren los primeros años de su vida en Japón hasta que se muda a Estados Unidos (nikeí se refiere a los japoneses en la diáspora). Incluyó relatos de su época en los varios campos de internamiento donde más de 100.000 japoneses o de ascendencia japonesa fueron obligados a vivir durante la segunda guerra mundial. En los campos, Kano dirigía cultos, ministraba a los que se encontraban cerca de él y les enseñaba, incluidos sus carceleros, otros reclusos y alemanes prisioneros de guerra.“Estuvo ausente tres años” recordaba su hijo Cyrus Kano, de 94 años, que junto con otros miembros de la familia y amigos asistieron al oficio religioso de la Convención.El Rdo. Fred Vergara, misionero de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera para el ministerio asioamericano, dijo que es importante que voces y testimonios tales como el de Kano se conmemoren y se incluyan en las constantes conversaciones de la Iglesia para inspirar a las generaciones futuras.Adeline Kano, de 87 años, dijo que ella seguía en directo la eucaristía desde la iglesia episcopal de San Pablo [St. Paul’s Episcopal Church] in Fort Collins, Colorado, donde su padre sirviera ocasionalmente cuando ya estaba jubilado.Myrne Watrous, feligresa de San Pablo que asistió a la eucaristía de la Convención en Salt Lake City, recalcó que el honor era merecido. “Si uno se fija en la vida de los santos, así fue la suya”, dijo ella de Kano, a quien conoció. “Él abandonó una vida de riqueza para convertirse en un granjero de Nebraska y predicar la palabra de Dios, divulgar el mensaje y recorrer el camino”.La nieta Susan Kano dijo que la sorprendía el tamaño del culto y la conmemoración. El único indicio que ella tuvo del papel de su abuelo en la comunidad fue la celebración de sus 50 años de matrimonio para él y su abuela, Aiko Ivy Kano. “La gente no cesaba de estrecharme la mano —cientos de personas— y de decirme ‘su abuelo es un santo’” recordaba ella.Agregó que ella consideraba que el tiempo que el pasó en los campos [de internamiento] fue un don para su ministerio. “Él tuvo una vida maravillosa”, afirmó.Las otras personas incluidas para la conmemoración litúrgica en la Resolución A055 fueron: Charles Raymond Barnes (a quien se le conmemoró en la eucaristía del 2 de julio), Artemisia Bowden, Albert Schweitzer y Dag Hammarskjold.El Rdo. Hiram KanoCyrus Kano, ingeniero mecánico jubilado que vive en Cape Cod, Massachusetts, dijo que su padre querría ser recordado “como un hombre de Dios”.Respecto a sus experiencias en el campo de internamiento, Kano convirtió la adversidad en territorio fértil para la misión: “Él dijo, bien, Dios me puso aquí, ¿qué es lo que Él quiere que yo haga?” recordaba su hijo.Además de organizar un colegio en el campamento, donde enseñaba inglés y otros cursos, llevó a cabo estudios de la naturaleza y dirigió oficios de culto mientras estuvo encarcelado.Kano inmigró a Estados Unidos después de haber tenido un encuentro juvenil con William Jennings Bryan en su natal Japón que despertó su sed de aventuras, según cuenta su hija, Adeline Kano. Sus orígenes eran privilegiados: “Mi abuelo era el gobernador de la prefectura de Kagoshina”, explicó Kano, de 87 años, durante una entrevista telefónica desde su hogar en Fort Collins.Al principio, Kano obtuvo una maestría en economía agrícola en la Universidad de Nebraska y no tardó en convertirse en activista y líder entre los “issei” o la comunidad nipoamericana de primera generación, muchos de los cuales habían venido a laborar en la agricultura o en los ferrocarriles.El Rvdmo. George Allen Beecher, entonces obispo de la Diócesis Misionera de Nebraska Occidental, oyó hablar del activismo de Kano en 1921, cuando los legisladores del estado estaban contemplando una legislación que excluía a los inmigrantes japoneses de poseer o heredar tierras, o incluso de arrendarlas por más de dos años. El proyecto de ley hasta les prohibía poseer acciones en compañías que ellos hubieran formado.Kano y Beecher se conocieron y viajaron junto al capitolio estatal para hablarles a los legisladores, quienes finalmente aprobaron una medida mucho menos restrictiva, según cuenta Kano en sus memorias.Beecher persuadió a Kano, varios años después, de que se convirtiera en misionero para la comunidad nipoamericana [de Nebraska], que entonces se calculaba en unas 600 personas. En 1925, Kano aceptó y la familia se mudó a North Platte. Tres años más tarde fue ordenado diácono y prestó servicios en dos congregaciones de misión. La iglesia de Santa María [St. Mary’s] en Mitchell y San Jorge [St. George’s] en North Platte. Fue ordenado al presbiterado en 1936.— La Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service y forma parte del equipo de ENS que está reportando sobre la 78a. Convención General. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Director of Music Morristown, NJ General Convention, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Por Pat McCaughan Posted Jul 2, 2015 Rector Belleville, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN Una vida santa: Hiram Hisanori Kano convirtió el campo de internamiento en campo de misióncenter_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tamborileros de taiko actúan en la eucaristía del 1 de julio en honor del difunto Rdo. Hiram Hisanori Kano. La 78ª. Convención General aprobó una resolución por la que incluía a Kano y a otros en Una gran nube de testigos: calendario de conmemoraciones. Foto de Pat McCaughan/ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] El trueno fragoroso de los tambores taiko recordaba a los fieles que asistían a la eucaristía del 1 de julio de la intensidad de la vida y el testimonio del desaparecido Rdo. Hiram Hisanori Kano, que transformó su prisión en los campos de internamiento durante la segunda guerra mundial en un campo de misión.Los asioamericanos se refieren a los campos de internamiento de la segunda guerra mundial donde recluyeron a japoneses y nipoamericanos como campos de concentración.Con la aprobación de la Resolución A055, la 78ª. Convención General incluyó oficialmente las conmemoraciones de Kano y de otros tres hombre y una mujer en Una gran nube de testigos: Calendario de conmemoraciones [“A Great Cloud of Witnesses: A Calendar of Commemorations”] que se usará en el próximo trienio. Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL General Convention 2015 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books last_img read more

World Council of Churches’ 2016 Christmas message

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first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Posted Dec 14, 2016 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Ecumenical & Interreligious Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Drawing by Massa Zahdeh, Dar Al-Kalima School, Bethlehem.[World Council of Churches] Christmas is a celebration of Jesus, the Christ. In this celebration we can see the mystery of the good being present in the midst of the ordinary, even in the midst of evil. It is a moment to ignite a light in darkness. Christmas is an opportunity to celebrate the presence of the God of life in a world where death is all too present.As Christians are celebrating Christmas, we renew our faith that the glory of God is shining in our midst. We celebrate that this happened through Jesus Christ, born by a woman as a human being, with all the potential of love and all the vulnerability that belongs to being a newborn child.There is no other way of being a human than by first being a child. As children we are given life through others; we need to be fed and we need to be clothed, we need the care of those around us, we need to learn from others, we need to be protected from dangers, violence, and illness. We need to belong to somebody, somewhere.Today many children are presented with enormous possibilities for their present and future lives. They are significant persons in their families, communities, homeland and in the globalized world. In all countries of the world they also face challenges, risks, even threats. Some are exposed to this much more than others, and much more than children should ever experience. This happens through conflicts, violence and other attacks on their vulnerable bodies and souls. Many children today, in greater numbers than we have seen since World War II, are refugees fleeing from their homes and protected living.This is also the story of the Son of God. The biblical narratives of the birth of Jesus convey all these dimensions of human life: care and love, as well as the enormous risks and threats to life. King Herod committed the gravest sin by killing all children in the area where Jesus was born to eradicate the threats to his power. Jesus and his family became refugees in Egypt.As the World Council of Churches, we affirm the role of churches in addressing the needs of children. We encourage one another to be at the forefront of offering care and protection for those who are most vulnerable among us, particularly those who are wounded and are refugees.  We want to make more contributions in this respect, embodying the qualities of child-friendly, caring and protecting churches.This year our Christmas greeting is made by children in Bethlehem. Their drawings are marvelous expressions of the beauty of life in the birthplace of Jesus, as well as the limitations and even threats to their lives through the ongoing occupation with its walls and wires. From the context of Bethlehem today their drawings give hope to all humanity. This corresponds to the hope we are given through the birth of Jesus long ago in Bethlehem. Seen through the eyes of children, this hope is even more costly and shining ever more clearly, to all children in danger, to all human beings of all ages and in all places, longing together for the kingdom of the Prince of Peace.May the children of Bethlehem experience signs of the kingdom of the Prince of Peace, the child who was born in their beautiful city! Let us celebrate Christmas, wherever we are, and may the love and care of God for all God’s children fill our hearts and guide our steps forward on our common pilgrimage of justice and peace!Rev. Dr Olav Fykse TveitGeneral SecretaryWorld Council of Churches Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Anglican Communion, Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 center_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York World Council of Churches’ 2016 Christmas message Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

Priest in Bahamas asks for prayers after Hurricane Dorian devastates…

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first_imgPriest in Bahamas asks for prayers after Hurricane Dorian devastates islands Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Posted Sep 6, 2019 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL Anglican Communion, Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Environment & Climate Change Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY [Anglican Communion News Service] After Hurricane Dorian left a trail of devastation in the Bahamas, the priest at St. Stephen’s Anglican Church in Grand Bahama has asked for prayer for all those affected.Giving an update on a local TV station, the Rev. Kirkland Russel said his community had no electricity, and the water has been turned off. He asked for prayers and support for all those suffering and the families of those who have already been killed.“We are getting a lot of rain and driving wind, but the main problem we are having right now is the storm surge coming from the north, and a lot of people’s homes are getting flooded out,” he said. “They are trapped on their roofs or scrambling out of their homes trying to find shelter.”Read the full article here. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OHlast_img read more