Teacher guilty of indecently assaulting schoolboys

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first_imgPrint Limerick District CourtAndrew [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up A RETIRED teacher has been remanded in custody after being found guilty of 30 charges of indecently assaulting a number of schoolboys he taught in a Limerick school over 35 years ago.Following a trial that included nine days of evidence and more than 10 hours of deliberations over four days, the jury of seven men and five women convicted the retired teacher by majority verdict on 30 counts but were unable to reach agreement on a verdict in the remaining 42 charges before the court.The teacher, who can not be named for legal reasons, did not seek bail following the pronouncement of the jury’s verdict and has been remanded in custody pending a sentencing hearing next month.The 73-year-old retired teacher faced multiple charges of indecently assaulting 13 Limerick schoolboys on dates between September 1, 1978 and June 30, 1981.During the trial, the teacher denied all 72 counts relating to the 13 boys in the Limerick school.However, the jury convicted the teacher of assaults on six of the complainants, but were unable to reach a verdict in relation to the other seven men.During the trial, the jury sitting before Limerick Circuit Court heard evidence that Detective Garda Deirdre Foley told the court that after receiving complaints relating to the allegations, gardai obtained the roll book from the Limerick primary school and interviewed all members of the class who attended during the relevant years.The teacher was convicted of inappropriately touching and fondling the genitals of the boys, both inside and outside their clothing in the classroom at the primary school. He was also convicted of forcibly kissing a schoolboy on the lips in the corridors of the Limerick school at various times during the year.Former students of the school described how they felt humiliated at the actions of the teacher.”I thought he was tickling me, I had no understanding… but then I felt humiliated, ashamed and frightened,” he recalled.He described how he sat frozen at his desk, as the teacher walked around the class room.“In the end you would be terrorised as he walked down the aisle hoping he would pass you by and wouldn’t be next,” be continued.One complainant, in his evidence, said that he was fearful at times during class as the teacher would “molest boys at random”.One of the witnesses said that “The first thing I can remember, and the most striking is that he would stick his hands down my pants and sexually assault me, every day, sometimes twice a day, week in week out, month after monthThe jury of seven men and five women heard details of two statements that were read in to court from two members of the class who said that they did not see any of the abuse occurring.During the nine days of evidence in the trial, a Limerick sex offender attributed his own crimes to the fact he was allegedly sexually abused buy the teacher.The 44-year-old man who is serving a prison sentence told the trial that he “vividly” remembers the teacher as they had “a lot of interactions”.The convicted sex offender said his teacher “managed the class with the threat of violence”. He would beat the students as well as carry out the indecent assaults.“I would be sitting at my desk and he would loosen my tie and unbutton my shirt before putting his hand down the front of my body and touching my private parts”.“This happened up to three times a week. Sometime he would be touching himself too under his cloak”.He claimed that he was also abused in the cloakroom and during PE class.“We were doing exercises and I was lying down on my back, like everyone else, and he would kneel down and touch me inside my shorts”.During his evidence, the 44-year-old said “the abuse against me was the biggest contributing factor to my offending. It was a consequence of what I suffered”.However the jury said that they were unable to reach a verdict relating to these charges.Another witness said that the teacher kissed him on the lips.“His lips would be moving over mine as I would be trying to pull back. He would then asked me if I liked it, before sending me home. I would brace myself at storytime as he would sit on my desk and open my shirt before putting his hand down to touch my penis and testicles”, he said.Earlier in the trial, the court heard that the teacher allegedly made a young boy stand inside a makeshift “dock” where he indecently assaulted him at the top of the classroom.The teacher asked the class what punishment the boy should receive and the witness described how the teacher pulled down his underwear and touched his private parts.“I couldn’t react because I was terrified. I got slapped with leather after he was finished with the ‘so-called court case’,” but again the jury were unable to reach a verdict relating to this charge.Shortly before 4:30pm this Wednesday, the jury returned their verdicts in 30 of the 72 charges and advised the court that they would not be able to agree a verdict on the remaining counts.State Prosecution Counsel John O’Sullivan said that following the return of the 30 guilty verdicts, he would have to take instruction from the DPP on the remaining charges.Judge John Hannan thanked the jury for their efforts and many hours in deliberating and expressed his “gratitude for doing so”.Given the length of the trial and the “difficult and challenging evidence”, Judge Hannan excused each of the 12 jurors from jury service for a period of 10 years.Defence Counsel Andrew Sexton said that the teacher was not applying for bail and Judge Hannan remanded the 73-year-old in custody, on consent, to December 9 next for the court to fix an early date for sentencing. Advertisement Facebook First Irish death from Coronavirus Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April Proceedures and appointments cancelled again at UHL Twitter Shannondoc operating but only by appointment TAGSfeatured center_img No vaccines in Limerick yet WhatsApp Previous articleTalking as to how Small Art WorksNext articleHorse Racing – Limerick Trainer Enda Bolger nominated for a 2015 Horse Racing Ireland Award Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Linkedin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsBreaking newsTeacher guilty of indecently assaulting schoolboysBy Staff Reporter – November 25, 2015 1052 Surgeries and clinic cancellations extended Emaillast_img read more

He’s got a head start

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first_img“When I look in the mirror, I think I look like a Marx brother,” joked Daniel Lieberman. But, he insists, beneath our daily quibbles with how our faces look, our heads are wonderlands that we often take for granted. After all, their design was millions of years in the making.In Lieberman’s new book, “The Evolution of the Human Head,” he discusses how complex parts of the body can and do evolve, and he traces the head’s perpetual slow makeover as it unfolded in the hominin fossil record.“The human head is remarkably different than any other mammal’s,” Lieberman told a capacity crowd at the Harvard Museum of Natural History last month. “We have wide, round heads, vertical foreheads, prominent eyebrows … We’re the only primate without a snout, and we alone have an external nose.”And we’re also the only species with a chin, he said. Lieberman, a professor of human evolutionary biology and the department chair of human evolutionary biology, said that “by considering craniofacial development, function, and evolution, we can gain insights into how and why the human head is the way it is, and how complexly integrated structures like heads work and evolve.”Climate change was a driving theme for the head’s evolution, said Lieberman. One example is the australopiths — hominins who lived through a period of climate cooling and drying in Africa — who evolved big, thick teeth, large chewing muscles, and a bite force twice that of modern humans to help devour fruits and tubers. “They were serious chompers,” he said.An even bigger shift, noted Lieberman, occurred around 2 million years ago in early species of the genus Homo, especially Homo erectus. “It was then that we became hunter-gatherers, and in so doing lost our snouts, shrank our teeth, and changed in other ways,” he said.This shift happened while the climate continued to cool, the woodlands shrank, and the African savannah expanded. As fruits and tubers became scarcer, species of early Homo began eating meat and using stone tools. Because they ran to hunt and trekked long distances for gathering in the heat, an external nose evolved to make it more efficient to exchange moisture. Cranial features also evolved to assist with balance, and we possibly lost our fur and multiplied our sweat glands to thermo-regulate by sweating.Globular brains and small, retracted faces epitomize the modern human head. Evolution also tinkered with the location of the pharynx, allowing for more articulate speech, which helped jumpstart “an explosion of cultural change in the Upper Paleolithic” period.“What is the future of the human head?” Lieberman pondered. Although natural selection may not be much evident now, our way of life is certainly causing changes. One is in oral health, as we accumulate cavities due to a diet high in starch and sugar. In addition, “Our jaws aren’t growing as large as they used to,” he explained, since we don’t have to chew as vigorously because we eat such highly processed food.This is a case, Lieberman said to the children in the audience, “where your parents are probably wrong.“Chew more gum,” he instructed. “Eat less processed food.”last_img read more

Dodgers release Miguel Olivo two days after ear-biting fight with teammate Alex Guerrero

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first_imgThe Dodgers released Miguel Olivo on Thursday, two days after the catcher slugged teammate Alex Guerrero and bit off a portion of his ear in the middle of a Triple-A game in Salt Lake City, Utah.Olivo had been suspended by the Albuquerque Isotopes on Wednesday. The Dodgers have 39 players on their 40-man roster.The 35-year-old was only added to the Dodgers’ 40-man roster in April after a somewhat tumultuous spring training. Olivo signed a minor-league deal with the Dodgers in January and received an invitation to the major-league camp. Despite batting .263 (5 for 19) in limited Cactus League playing time, Olivo was returned to the minor leagues as the Dodgers opted to keep three catchers (A.J. Ellis, Drew Butera and Tim Federowicz).Olivo requested his release at the time but ultimately accepted an assignment to Albuquerque, where he batted .368 (28 for 76). After Ellis was placed on the disabled list and Federowicz struggled to hit major-league pitching, the Dodgers purchased Olivo’s contract May 1 and let him start six of the next 10 games. But Olivo struggled to hit too. He struck out nine times in his last 13 at-bats while failing to collect a hit. When Ellis was activated from the disabled list May 14, Olivo was optioned back to Albuquerque. Tuesday marked Olivo’s fourth start since returning to the minors.Guerrero is staying in a Salt Lake City-area hospital after undergoing plastic surgery Tuesday to re-attach the missing portion of his left ear. He is expected to be out long-term; one report Tuesday pegged the timetable for recovery at five weeks. Guerrero hasn’t decided whether or not to file criminal charges against Olivo. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

History in the making at Men’s County Finals

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first_img Tags: Kent, Men’s County Finals, Men’s Golf, Northumberland, Nottinghamshire, Somerset, Yorkshire Nottinghamshire and Somerset are both eyeing a place in the history books when they take part in this week’s Men’s County Finals at Huddersfield GC.Neither county has ever won the prized trophy which has been the subject of fierce competition ever since the event was first staged at Formby in 1926.By contrast, the other two finalists – Kent and Northumberland – have enjoyed past success although you need to delve deep into the records to discover their achievements.Kent’s solitary victory came in 1978 when they claimed the prize at Frilford Heath.Northumberland gave a new meaning to the phrase ‘Swinging Sixties’ when they ruled the roost in 1960, 1962, 1964 and 1965.The winners of the northern qualifying section will enter this year’s event with their tails up after City of Newcastle Golf Club lifted the England Champion Club trophy last weekend.The trio of Alex Dixon, Phil Ridden and Andrew Minnikin were victorious at Romford GC to book a place at the European Men’s Club trophy at Golf du Medoc on October 24-26 and form the core of the seven-man team for this tournament.Should they carry forward last weekend’s form then Northumberland will surely be the team to beat.The four counties will compete at the renowned Yorkshire venue over Friday, Saturday and Sunday having all won regional qualifiers to make the finals.The format for the three days of round-robin competition is as follows;AM – Three games of foursomes. PM – six games of singles.Two match points per day will be awarded for a win and one point for a half. If counties are tied on match points at the end of the competition then the winners will be decided by the overall games points tally.If counties are still tied then the head-to-head record will come into play and if they still can’t be separated then the title will be shared.A year ago, record-breaking Yorkshire were the leaders of the pack at Aldeburgh Golf Club after a thrilling finale.Having won two matches and drawn the other to share top spot with Gloucestershire, Yorkshire prevailed by half a point in terms of the overall game points.Incredibly, it was the 22nd time Yorkshire had got their hands on the silverware. Nottinghamshire:  Cole Betteridge, Jordan Boulton, Adam Dorricott, Martin Foulkes, Darren Kirton, Ross Overton, Mark Porter, 26 Sep 2019 History in the making at Men’s County Finals Northumberland: Alex Dixon, Gary Donnison, Sean Heads, Matty Lamb, Andrew Minnikin, Phil Ridden, Mark Wharton Kent: Joshua Bristow, Liam Burns, Mason Essam, Jensen Hull, Jacob Kelso, Ben Quinney, Tom Sherreard Somerset: Craig Adams, Thomas Burley, Sam Fernley, Thomas Plumb, Will Poole, Taylor Stote, Philip White THIS YEAR’S SQUADS Photograph credit: Leaderboardlast_img read more