Radio journalist’s throat cut in DRC

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first_img Democratic Republic of CongoAfrica February 18, 2021 Find out more Democratic Republic of CongoAfrica Follow the news on Democratic Republic of Congo Reporter jailed in DRC for allegedly defaming parliamentarian Organisation Journalist arrested on provincial governor’s orders RSF_en April 21, 2015 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Radio journalist’s throat cut in DRC News to go furthercenter_img News Help by sharing this information News February 24, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders is appalled by radio journalist Soleil Balanga’s brutal murder in Monkoto, in the northern province of Equateur. Balanga’s throat was cut by an assailant as he was returning home on 16 April from Monkoto community radio, where he worked.According to Radio Okapi, he was attacked by the son of Monkoto general hospital’s supervisor because he broadcast a report referring to the appointment of a new doctor to replace the alleged assaillant’s father. The police have arrested the reported killer.“We condemn this shocking murder and call on the police and justice system to conduct a proper investigation and punish those responsible,” said Cléa Kahn-Sriber, the head of the Reporters Without Borders Africa desk.Crimes of violence against journalists are rarely the subject of proper investigations and judicial proceedings in Democratic Republic of Congo. A total of 60 journalists were beaten or threatened in 2013-2014, in some cases by the police, without any investigation aimed at identifying their assailants. The murders of Serge Maheshe, Didace Namujimbo and several others remain to be solved. This impunity encourages more violence against media personnel.DRC is ranked 150th out of 180 countries in the 2015 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index. Receive email alerts Congolese reporter wounded by gunshot while covering protest in Goma News February 16, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Teacher guilty of indecently assaulting schoolboys

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first_imgPrint Limerick District CourtAndrew [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up A RETIRED teacher has been remanded in custody after being found guilty of 30 charges of indecently assaulting a number of schoolboys he taught in a Limerick school over 35 years ago.Following a trial that included nine days of evidence and more than 10 hours of deliberations over four days, the jury of seven men and five women convicted the retired teacher by majority verdict on 30 counts but were unable to reach agreement on a verdict in the remaining 42 charges before the court.The teacher, who can not be named for legal reasons, did not seek bail following the pronouncement of the jury’s verdict and has been remanded in custody pending a sentencing hearing next month.The 73-year-old retired teacher faced multiple charges of indecently assaulting 13 Limerick schoolboys on dates between September 1, 1978 and June 30, 1981.During the trial, the teacher denied all 72 counts relating to the 13 boys in the Limerick school.However, the jury convicted the teacher of assaults on six of the complainants, but were unable to reach a verdict in relation to the other seven men.During the trial, the jury sitting before Limerick Circuit Court heard evidence that Detective Garda Deirdre Foley told the court that after receiving complaints relating to the allegations, gardai obtained the roll book from the Limerick primary school and interviewed all members of the class who attended during the relevant years.The teacher was convicted of inappropriately touching and fondling the genitals of the boys, both inside and outside their clothing in the classroom at the primary school. He was also convicted of forcibly kissing a schoolboy on the lips in the corridors of the Limerick school at various times during the year.Former students of the school described how they felt humiliated at the actions of the teacher.”I thought he was tickling me, I had no understanding… but then I felt humiliated, ashamed and frightened,” he recalled.He described how he sat frozen at his desk, as the teacher walked around the class room.“In the end you would be terrorised as he walked down the aisle hoping he would pass you by and wouldn’t be next,” be continued.One complainant, in his evidence, said that he was fearful at times during class as the teacher would “molest boys at random”.One of the witnesses said that “The first thing I can remember, and the most striking is that he would stick his hands down my pants and sexually assault me, every day, sometimes twice a day, week in week out, month after monthThe jury of seven men and five women heard details of two statements that were read in to court from two members of the class who said that they did not see any of the abuse occurring.During the nine days of evidence in the trial, a Limerick sex offender attributed his own crimes to the fact he was allegedly sexually abused buy the teacher.The 44-year-old man who is serving a prison sentence told the trial that he “vividly” remembers the teacher as they had “a lot of interactions”.The convicted sex offender said his teacher “managed the class with the threat of violence”. He would beat the students as well as carry out the indecent assaults.“I would be sitting at my desk and he would loosen my tie and unbutton my shirt before putting his hand down the front of my body and touching my private parts”.“This happened up to three times a week. Sometime he would be touching himself too under his cloak”.He claimed that he was also abused in the cloakroom and during PE class.“We were doing exercises and I was lying down on my back, like everyone else, and he would kneel down and touch me inside my shorts”.During his evidence, the 44-year-old said “the abuse against me was the biggest contributing factor to my offending. It was a consequence of what I suffered”.However the jury said that they were unable to reach a verdict relating to these charges.Another witness said that the teacher kissed him on the lips.“His lips would be moving over mine as I would be trying to pull back. He would then asked me if I liked it, before sending me home. I would brace myself at storytime as he would sit on my desk and open my shirt before putting his hand down to touch my penis and testicles”, he said.Earlier in the trial, the court heard that the teacher allegedly made a young boy stand inside a makeshift “dock” where he indecently assaulted him at the top of the classroom.The teacher asked the class what punishment the boy should receive and the witness described how the teacher pulled down his underwear and touched his private parts.“I couldn’t react because I was terrified. I got slapped with leather after he was finished with the ‘so-called court case’,” but again the jury were unable to reach a verdict relating to this charge.Shortly before 4:30pm this Wednesday, the jury returned their verdicts in 30 of the 72 charges and advised the court that they would not be able to agree a verdict on the remaining counts.State Prosecution Counsel John O’Sullivan said that following the return of the 30 guilty verdicts, he would have to take instruction from the DPP on the remaining charges.Judge John Hannan thanked the jury for their efforts and many hours in deliberating and expressed his “gratitude for doing so”.Given the length of the trial and the “difficult and challenging evidence”, Judge Hannan excused each of the 12 jurors from jury service for a period of 10 years.Defence Counsel Andrew Sexton said that the teacher was not applying for bail and Judge Hannan remanded the 73-year-old in custody, on consent, to December 9 next for the court to fix an early date for sentencing. Advertisement Facebook First Irish death from Coronavirus Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April Proceedures and appointments cancelled again at UHL Twitter Shannondoc operating but only by appointment TAGSfeatured center_img No vaccines in Limerick yet WhatsApp Previous articleTalking as to how Small Art WorksNext articleHorse Racing – Limerick Trainer Enda Bolger nominated for a 2015 Horse Racing Ireland Award Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Linkedin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsBreaking newsTeacher guilty of indecently assaulting schoolboysBy Staff Reporter – November 25, 2015 1052 Surgeries and clinic cancellations extended Emaillast_img read more

Police cruiser stolen from officer’s home then abandoned

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first_imgThe Coral Gables police department is currently searching for information on the theft of one of their police cruisers after it was stolen from an officer’s home and then abandoned under an interstate 95 overpass.Officials believe the theft happened either overnight Sunday or sometime early Monday morning.The stolen vehicle was located later Monday morning by another officer under the Interstate 95 overpass at Northwest 77th Street.While no weapons were stolen from the cruiser, officials say the thief did rummage through the vehicle and that the back window had been smashed.If you have any information about the theft you are asked to contact Coral Gables police at 305-442-1600.last_img read more

Union says other college teams in play

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first_imgFormer Northwestern University football quarterback Kain Colter, right, Ramogi Huma, founder and President of the National College Players Association left, and Tim Waters, Political Director of the United Steel Workers, arrive on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, April, 2, 2014. Members of a group seeking to unionize college athletes are looking for allies on Capitol Hill as they brace for an appeal of a ruling that said full scholarship athletes at Northwestern University are employees who have the right to form a union. Colter _ the face of a movement to give college athletes the right to unionize _ and Ramogi Huma, the founder and president of the National College Players Association, scheduled meetings Wednesday with lawmakers. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke)Players from other universities have expressed interest in forming unions in the wake of the landmark decision last week involving the Northwestern football team, a union organizer said Friday.Tim Waters of the United Steelworkers would not disclose the players or their schools, saying it was too early to reveal who they are. But he said they reached out following the decision last week by a regional director of the National Labor Relations Board declaring Northwestern’s football players have the right to form a union.“We’re not giving out who it is or who they are, but the answer is yes,” said Waters. “There’s a lot of excitement out there. We’ve been contacted by a number of players.”A member of Wisconsin’s Final Four basketball team said he participated in weekly conference calls in recent months with the union and Ramogi Huma, head of the National College Players Association, and other players. The NCPA and the steelworkers are working together on the union push, with the NCAA, Big Ten Conference and Northwestern opposing the move.“I don’t know exactly how many there were.  But on average on a weekly call there were probably 10 or 20, at least,” said Zach Bohannon, a reserve on the team. “So it was definitely a unique experience just hearing the concerns that players all over the country had, and then just voicing my opinion.”Northwestern players will vote April 25 on whether to become the first college athletes represented by a union. But it could be years, if ever, before college athletes are given a seat at the bargaining table to discuss things like practice hours, medical care and concussions.Still, Waters said the publicity generated by the ruling that Northwestern football players are employees and can unionize has made more players aware that they, too, could have bargaining rights.“We’ve been contacted and are taking every one of them seriously,” he said. “It’s a process, a long process. But leaders of teams across the country have reached out and said we support it and are interested in looking at this for our team.”Complicating any effort for the steelworkers is that the NLRB ruling only applies to private schools like Northwestern. Public schools are covered by state labor laws, and in some states public employees are not allowed to unionize at all.Huma and the union have been working since 2000 to try and organize college players. Their goal, they say, is not to get schools to pay players but to give them bargaining rights over issues that affect their lives and could affect their health.It wasn’t, however, until after they had collected union authorization cards from a majority of players on the Northwestern football team in January that organizers announced the effort to unionize the team. Huma said Friday that was part of a strategy not to alert the NCAA or the schools in advance about any union activity.“They’ve been very out front all along that they don’t want any change like this,” said Huma, a former UCLA linebacker.Bohannon said he learned about the NCPA last summer from a former Wisconsin player, Jared Berggren, who suggested he get on the organization’s email list. That led to his participation, beginning in the fall, in a weekly conference call with organizers and players from other schools, he said.” It was just an hour weekly conference call and we talked about different issues that we found with the NCAA, what we can do going forward as student-athletes to help,” Bohannon said.Bohannon, who is in his final year of eligibility, said he wasn’t necessarily advocating for a union but wanted athletes to have more rights.“Being a Republican, I don’t like the whole unionization thing, I don’t think that’s probably the best option,” he said. “But right now it’s really, there’s not many other options for our student-athletes, so I think it got the necessary publicity that we need, and hopefully the NCAA listens to some of our voices.”___AP Sports Writer Genaro C. Armas in Arlington, Texas, contributed to this report.last_img read more

U.S. News and World Report’s Best Colleges Ranks Saint Martin’s University…

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first_imgFacebook195Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Saint Martin’s UniversitySaint Martin’s University has earned a place among the country’s best regional universities in the West, according to U.S. News & World Report’s 2020 Best Colleges rankings. The University is ranked 27th overall in the Western region, up from 37th in last year’s rankings. The Western region of universities includes institutions in Hawaii, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas.To determine overall rankings for universities and colleges, U.S. News and World Report says it evaluates higher education institutions based on 16 measures of academic quality, including first-year student retention, graduation rates, social mobility, class sizes, faculty resources, expert opinion, student excellence, alumni giving and other data. U.S. News and World Report defines regional universities as those that offer a broad scope of undergraduate degrees and some master’s degrees.“What is most impressive about this ranking is the leap from 37th to 27th in one year,” said Saint Martin’s University President Roy Heynderickx, Ph.D. “Our delivery of high quality, value-centered, transformative education is attracting notice nationally as well as regionally.”Saint Martin’s was also listed 41st among top-performing regional universities in the West for social mobility, a ranking that measures how well universities graduate students who receive federal Pell Grants, which typically are awarded to students from households with less than $50,000 in annual income.In addition, the University was listed 15th in the best colleges for veterans category among regional universities in the West.Saint Martin’s also ranked 37th for campus ethnic diversity among regional universities in the West, and the highest among regional universities in Washington state. U.S. News and World Report determines the campus ethnic diversity ranking by examining how likely it is for students to encounter others from a different ethnic group.“As a Catholic, Benedictine university, the community at Saint Martin’s takes great pride in ensuring that all are welcome,” said Kate Boyle, Ph.D., provost and vice president of academic affairs. “Our diversity provides opportunities for each of us to learn from one another. We encourage multiple perspectives of the world, as these experiences enrich our programs and our lives.”The University also earned a rank of 17 among the best value schools for regional universities in the West. U.S. News and World Report ranks best value schools by analyzing measures including the ratio of quality to price, the percentage of undergraduate students receiving need-based aid and the average discount (the percentage of an institution’s total sticker cost covered by need-based scholarships or grants for undergraduates in the 2018-2019 academic year).Saint Martin’s University is an independent, four-year, coeducational university located on a wooded campus of more than 300 acres in Lacey, Washington. Established in 1895 by the Catholic Order of Saint Benedict, the University is one of 13 Benedictine colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, and the only one west of the Rocky Mountains. Saint Martin’s University prepares students for successful lives through its 29 majors, 11 graduate programs and five certificate programs spanning the liberal arts, business, education, nursing and engineering. Saint Martin’s welcomes more than 1,300 undergraduate students and 250 graduate students from many ethnic and religious backgrounds to its Lacey campus, and more students to its extended campus located at Joint Base Lewis-McChord. Visit the Saint Martin’s University website at www.stmartin.edu.last_img read more