Shadow Minister to speak at London Region IoF AGM

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first_imgTo book, contact Andy Cawdell at [email protected] Howard Lake | 1 September 2007 | News Tagged with: Events About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img Greg Clark MP, former Shadow Charities Minister, is the guest speaker at the IoF London Region’s AGM on Thursday (6 September).Clark became Shadow Minister for the Cabinet Office in the latest Tory party reshuffle, but spent some time as the Shadow Charities Minister.The AGM takes place at the Little Ship Club in London on Thursday from 6pm. Entry is free to members, and there is a £15 charge for non-members. Advertisement Shadow Minister to speak at London Region IoF AGM  18 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

Poyet keen on Chelsea job

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first_imgEx-Chelsea midfielder Gus Poyet says he would love to return to Stamford Bridge as manager and would find it hard to resist any approach from the club.Poyet, currently in charge at Brighton, told Sky Sports News he would be tempted to leave if either of his former sides Chelsea and Tottenham wanted him.He admitted: “I would say we would have a problem – the chairman knows that.“I think these clubs that you played for, in my case Spurs and Chelsea, normally you are closer to them and it is easier because they know you.”Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

GBA Prime Sneak Peek: Green Building in the Cheap Energy Era

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first_imgClick here to follow Martin Holladay on Twitter. 1. Interest in green building is down because energy is cheapLet’s face it: most Americans don’t care too much about saving energy when energy is affordable. Compared to your cell phone bill, Internet bill, and cable TV bill, your electricity bill may seem reasonable. So why worry about it?When energy prices drop, the payback period for energy-efficiency measures increases. Some homeowners are happy to spend $6,000 on attic insulation if the payback period for the investment is 10 years. Once the payback period stretches to 20 years, though, the investment seems less wise. Energy Predictions for 2012Designing for the FutureU.S. Wind Energy Prices Hit an All-Time LowCost of Solar Electricity Hits a New LowThe End of Peak Oil?PV Systems Have Gotten Dirt CheapThe Big Allure of Cheap PV 8. The Paris agreement shows that the international political mood has shiftedI’m a cynic. Here’s a cynic’s report of what happened at the Paris climate change talks: not much. All of the announced carbon-reduction targets were non-binding. And even if every country manages to meet the non-binding targets, the efforts will be too little, too late.I’m also imbued with hope. (As philosophers of hope note, hopeful people look for results they cannot see, in the teeth of evidence undermining that hope. Hope is not logical.) Here’s a hopeful person’s report of what happened in Paris: The international political mood has irrevocably shifted. Unlike Republican politicians in the U.S., the leaders of most of the world’s nations now (a) understand that the planet’s climate is changing, (b) recognize that CO2 emissions due to human activities are responsible for most of this climate change, and (c) accept the necessity of implementing policies that will reduce or reverse the rate of climate change.Once this political shift has happened, there’s no going back to the status quo ante — the bad old days when denial ruled. 2. Fracking and new drilling technologies have dramatically increased U.S. oil and natural gas productionThis is old news, but it bears repeating. The “peak oil” concerns of the late 1990s have faded due to the surprising increase in U.S. oil and gas production in the first decade of this century.In an article published in January 2015, Fortune magazine noted, “The rise of hydraulic fracking from Montana to Texas to Pennsylvania has lifted U.S. oil production mightily, from 5.6 million barrels a day in 2010, to a current rate of 9.3 million.” U.S. oil and gas production. [Image credit: Wall Street Journal.]Of course, the U.S. wells that caused this dramatic increase in oil and gas production were drilled when energy prices were high. The resulting glut of oil and natural gas has contributed to the collapse of oil prices, and the collapse in oil prices calls into question whether oil and gas companies can justify further drilling. Finally, there’s another wrinkle to consider: wells drilled using the new technology have a shorter productive life than wells drilled with older methods.The final result of the interaction between all of these factors is far from clear: the U.S. may end up with a surplus of oil and gas for decades, or the current glut may be an anomaly. Martin Holladay’s previous blog: “Climate Affects Home Design.” Homeowners’ interest in energy efficiency measures waxes and wanes. During the 1970s, when oil prices repeatedly spiked upwards, everyone wanted to save energy. However, in the 1980s, when oil prices collapsed, Americans forgot about saving energy, and most of us reverted to our usual wasteful habits.By 2008, oil prices were high again, and green builders were receiving lots of phone calls from homeowners who wanted lower energy bills. But between June 2014 and now, oil prices have collapsed again, tumbling from $115 to between $37 and $40 a barrel. This raises several questions:What’s going on with energy prices?What does the future hold?What do low energy prices mean for green builders?New Year’s Day is a good time to make predictions for the year ahead. I’ll attempt to answer the questions I’ve posed with a list of ten points. RELATED ARTICLES 5. Dropping oil prices aren’t killing the PV and wind industriesThe price of photovoltaic (PV) modules is dropping so fast that even low oil and gas prices aren’t enough to put much of a dent in the PV revolution. This flies in the face of conventional wisdom — it used to be said that “low oil prices are bad for renewable energy” — but it’s true.In windy regions of the world, electricity produced by wind turbines is now less expensive than electricity produced by fossil fuel-burning plants — and the per-kW capital cost to build the wind turbines is much less that the per-kW cost to build a coal plant or a nuclear power plant. In many parts of the world, PV power is also cost-competitive with electricity generated by conventional power plants. These renewable energy sources are setting (more or less) a ceiling for electricity prices — a ceiling that is surprisingly low. These facts can be used to argue that we’re more likely to face a cheap energy future than an expensive energy future.As GBA has reported, homeowners who invest in PV often discover that their investment yields a better return than corporate bonds or the stock market. All across the planet, the installed cost of PV is still dropping. In Australia, large residential PV systems are being installed for $1 per watt. Moreover, the U.S. Congress recently reauthorized the 30% tax credit for residential solar equipment — a move that will give a further push in the U.S. to the apparently unstoppable PV juggernaut.The PV revolution has barely begun. When this snowball starts rolling downhill, get ready for an avalanche. [Image credit: New York Times.]4. The U.S. coal industry is in steep declineU.S. coal companies are beginning to go bankrupt. While this news is distressing to workers in the coal industry, it amounts to more good news for the environment.In a story published on December 3, 2015, the New York Times reported that “a wave of a half-dozen bankruptcies has hit major coal companies. … Hal Harvey, chief executive of Energy Innovation, a policy research group, said that even though countries will continue to burn a lot of coal, the broader trend of coal’s decline is clear. ‘It’s not whether, but when,’ he said.” Farsi-speaking readers can find a translation of this article here: “Green Building in the Cheap Energy Era” in Farsi. 7. Electric utilities are facing major disruptionElectric utilities in the U.S. can be divided roughly into two groups. In the first group are solar-hostile utilities like We Energies in Wisconsin; these utilities are facing the future by kicking and screaming.In the second group are solar-friendly utilities like Green Mountain Power in Vermont. These utilities realize that “distributed generation” is an inevitable part of the future grid. (Distributed generation is a term that describes small systems that generate electricity near where the electricity is used.) The most disruptive element of the distributed generation revolution is PV; electric utilities that embrace PV are likely to be more nimble than the “kicking and screaming” group.Electric utilities that have invested in large, expensive fossil-fuel-fired generating plants or nuclear plants will probably have to write down some of their assets over the coming years, because the PV and battery revolution will make many of these plants unnecessary and therefore obsolete. This process will be painful for most utilities, many of which are likely to declare bankruptcy. 6. As battery prices drop, grid defection opportunities increaseThe Achilles’ heel of off-grid PV systems is the high price of batteries. Most GBA readers know, however, that Tesla is now building a mega-factory in Nevada to produce lithium-ion batteries; once this factory begins production, battery prices are scheduled to drop. The longer the factory operates, the lower the expected price for the batteries produced there.Meanwhile, competing battery manufacturers are predicting that they’ll be able to match Tesla’s prices.There aren’t any technical hurdles preventing homeowners from generating their own electricity and storing the energy in batteries for use at night and on cloudy days. The only hurdle is economic. In areas where electricity costs are high and PV costs are low, it already makes sense for some utility customers to cut the cord and go off-grid — a move known as “grid defection.”PV prices and battery prices are both trending downward. These trends show every sign of continuing for a few more years, so grid defection is likely to increase. Before going through these ten points, though, it’s worth emphasizing the fact that the world oil market is fairly responsive to changes in supply and demand. When the demand for oil exceeds the supply, prices rise. When the supply of oil exceeds the demand, prices fall.Right now, oil producers are pumping lots of oil out of the ground — at a time when efficiency improvements (for example, improvements in vehicle fuel efficiency) have slowed the rate at which demand is increasing. The predictable result: prices have fallen. 9. Saudi Arabia may be beginning to see the writing on the wallRight now, Saudi Arabia is pumping lots of oil and selling the oil on the international market. Fellow OPEC members wish that Saudi Arabia would reduce oil production — a move that might help raise the price of oil. Saudi Arabia has refused. So what’s going on?We don’t know; all we can do is speculate. In Saudi Arabia, the cost of oil production is quite low — about $9.90 per barrel. In contrast, the cost of production is about $17.20 per barrel in Russia and $36.20 per barrel in the U.S. Because of these disparities in production costs, low oil prices hurt Russia and the U.S. much more than they hurt Saudi Arabia.Saudi Arabia’s decision to keep pumping large quantities of oil has led analysts to propose at least two conspiracy theories. Theory #1 is that Saudi Arabia is conspiring with the U.S. to cripple the economies of two rival oil producers: Russia and Iran. (Saudi Arabia has accumulated huge foreign currency reserves, and is thus better able to ride out several years of low oil prices than either Russia or Iran, both of which are relatively cash-poor.) Russia provides economic and military support to the governments of Iran and Syria — governments which are at political odds with the U.S. and Saudi Arabia.Theory #2 is a variation on Theory #1. It holds that Saudi Arabia is hoping to cripple the oil industries of three rival countries: Russia, Iran, and the U.S. According to this theory, the U.S. is a victim rather than a co-conspirator.I’m not going to comment on the two theories that I just summarized, in part because I’m not a fan of conspiracy theories. I’m more interested in a different explanation of what’s going on. It’s possible that Saudi Arabia’s leaders realize that we are in the last decades of the fossil fuel era. They probably see a variety of factors at play, including increasing international concern about climate change, the rapid development of electric vehicles, and dropping prices for electricity generated by PV modules and wind turbines. Saudi leaders may have concluded that they might as well sell as much oil as they can right now — because in a few decades, they may not be able to sell much oil at all.An article published in the International Business Times on May 22, 2015 reported: “Saudi Arabia, the desert kingdom which was built on exporting crude oil, is predicting that fossil fuels will become a thing of the past by 2050. And the world’s largest crude exporter believes that in the not-too-distant future it will be exporting solar energy instead. … Speaking at a climate change conference in Paris on 21 May [2015], oil minister Ali Al-Naimi said: ‘In Saudi Arabia we recognize that eventually, one of these days, we’re not going to need fossil fuels. I don’t know when — 2040, 2050 or thereafter. So we have embarked on a program to develop solar energy.’ Al-Naimi added that ‘hopefully, one of these days, instead of exporting fossil fuels, we will be exporting gigawatts of electric power.’ He noted that oil prices as low as $30 or $40 a barrel wouldn’t make solar power uneconomic.” GBA Prime subscribers have access to many articles that aren’t accessible to non-subscribers, including Martin Holladay’s weekly blog series, “Musings of an Energy Nerd.” To whet the appetite of non-subscribers, we occasionally offer non-subscribers access to a “GBA Prime Sneak Peek” article like this one. 10. Green builders need to focus on issues other than low energy billsMost homeowners aren’t willing to spend much money to lower their energy bills. Green builders can respond to homeowner indifference about energy costs two ways: either indignantly or pragmatically. The indignant path might include exasperated outbursts — “think about our dying planet,” perhaps — along with attempts to educate homeowners about their ethical responsibility to use as little energy as possible.The pragmatic path, on the other hand, requires green builders to accept homeowner indifference about energy costs as a fact.I would advise green builders that it’s probably time to stop selling your work on the basis of low energy bills. According to most marketing experts, the new recommended mantra is “a green home is more comfortable than a conventional home.”Some green builders use another marketing ploy: bragging that green homes are healthy homes. If you’re tempted to follow this path, be careful. There is very little evidence that occupants of green homes are healthier than occupants of conventional homes. Without any data to support your claims, it’s better to steer clear of any discussions about occupant health.If you’re really, really lucky, you’ll get a few phone calls from clients who say, “I’m interested in lowering my carbon footprint.” Those clients are rare — but they are a lot of fun to work with. 3. The oil sands business in Alberta is in troubleOil producers in Alberta, Canada, have made huge investments in facilities that extract oil from bitumen-laced sand. But extracting oil from tar sands is expensive. The process requires lots of money, lots of energy, and lots of water. The environmental damage from the process — including problems related to deforestation, water pollution, CO2 emissions, and the creation of tailing ponds — is alarming.It’s so expensive to produce a barrel of oil from the tar sands of Alberta that this type of production isn’t profitable unless oil prices stay high. Since world oil prices have collapsed, the oil sands business is in deep trouble — and that’s good news for the environment.On August 24, 2105, the Toronto Star reported, “Analyst Menno Hulshof said more than three-quarters of Canada’s daily output of 2.2 million barrels of crude from the oil sands is being produced at a loss at current prices. He said thermal oil in which steam is pumped underground to heat reservoirs so bitumen can flow to the surface is losing money on every barrel produced.”A September 2015 report from the Business News Network explained that the tar sands industry is in decline, but that the full collapse of the industry is going to take several years. The story noted, “Mining for bitumen in the oil sands of northern Alberta is among the most expensive ways on earth to produce crude, but in the Fall 2015 Oil & Gas Overview report published by Peters & Company this week, miners believe there is ‘no oil price low enough’ for them to significantly scale back on production. That is largely because of the significant costs involved in shutting down such massive industrial processes and then attempting to restart them when prices rebound. As a result, Peters expects oil sands production to continue rising steadily until 2020 regardless of what happens with the price of oil. After 2020 is when oil sands production will stall without a significant price rebound.”last_img read more

10 months ago​Chelsea boss Sarri urges Hazard to end transfer speculation

9 months agoVives insists Barcelona have no regrets selling Alcacer

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first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Vives insists Barcelona have no regrets selling Alcacerby Carlos Volcano9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBarcelona chief Josep Vives insists there’s no regrets over the sale of Paco Alcacer.Alcacer is starring with Borussia Dortmund this season, while Barca are now in the market for a new backup striker.But Vives says they’re happy with the squad’s makeup.”There is no regret about the departure of Paco Alcacer. The management was very happy with him,” he said. “We are happy that things are going well.” last_img read more

2015 Pac-12 Tournament Bracket, Schedule, Analysis

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first_imgPac-12 tournament bracket for 2015 season.Twitter/@Pac12NetworkThe 2015 Pac-12 men’s basketball tournament is set to begin this Wednesday, March 11 and conclude on Saturday, March 14. It will take place at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. Here’s the bracket, along with the times for each game. Ticket information is available here. (@Pac12Networks)(@Pac12Networks)Pac-12 Tournament games will be broadcast on ESPN and Pac-12 Networks. arizonaFavorite: ArizonaFew teams in the nation have the talent of Arizona, and the Wildcats proved it with a 28-3 record on the season and 16-2 mark in Pac-12 play. Point guard T.J. McConnell is one of the steadiest floor generals in the nation, and has a number of dynamic scorers, including fantastic freshman Stanley Johnson, Brandon Ashley, and Rondae Hollis-Jefferson. Few teams have the balanced scoring of Arizona, which has six players averaging at least nine points per game. Arizona’s three losses—at UNLV, at Oregon State, and at Arizona State—came by a total of nine points. The Wildcats will be tough to overcome for their Pac-12 competition in Las Vegas.uclaSleeper: UCLAFrom December 13 to January 4, UCLA lost five straight games, and the Bruins’ NCAA Tournament chances looked bleak. UCLA finished the season 11-5 with big wins over Oregon and Utah, and now the Bruins are right on the bubble, and can help themselves with a good showing in Las Vegas. UCLA has five very capable scorers averaging over 10 points per game, but depth is a major concern. Bryce Alford, Isaac Hamilton, Kevon Looney, and Norman Powell all average over 30 minutes per game. Tony Parker averages just under 25 minutes per game, and only three other players play at least 10 minutes each night. If UCLA can keep its guys fresh, the starting five can compete with anyone else in the Pac-12, and with the tournament on the line, the Bruins will definitely be motivated to make a deep run.last_img read more

Heart Month to Focus on Diabetes

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first_imgThe Heart Foundation of Jamaica (HFJ) will observe Heart Month in February under the theme: ‘The Diabetic Heart: Are You at Risk?’    Speaking at a recent JIS Think, HFJ Executive Director, Deborah Chen, said the objective is to turn national attention to the connection between diabetes and heart disease.“I think if we can get people to realise that, we can actually have more persons being interested in control and prevention of diabetes, which is what we try to do at the HFJ,” she said.    She said the HFJ wants more persons with the disease to follow the advice of their doctors and nutritionists and practice a healthy lifestyle.   “Although some of the complications may sound very serious and it seems to be gloom and doom, you can, in fact, manage your condition if you have diabetes and if you don’t have it you can prevent yourself from getting it,” she noted.The HFJ will be increasing screening services during Heart Month.Visits will be made to health centres across the Corporate Area including Duhaney Park, Harbour View, Bethel Town, Guys Hill, Lawrence Tavern, Maxfield Park, Rollington Town, Norman Gardens and Waterford.     Free screenings will also be facilitated by sponsors at the HFJ’s 28 Beechwood Avenue headquarters on February 1; Boulevard Supercentre on February 8; at Breezy Castle on February 28; and at St. William Grant Park, downtown Kingston on a date to be announced.Other activities include outside broadcasts; a medical symposium for health professionals on February 19; and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Day on February 23 at the Heart Foundation’s offices.The HFJ is open for screening every day and the entity reaches persons across the island through its mobile service.last_img read more

Pak always underestimated our national leadership IAF chief

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first_imgMumbai: Pakistan always underestimated India’s national leadership and they did the same during the Balakot air strikes, IAF chief Air Chief Marshal Birender Singh Dhanoa said here on Friday. The IAF chief, who retires later this month, was speaking at the India Today Conclave. “You must remember that Pakistan has always underestimated our national leadership. Always. In the 1965 war, they underestimated Lal Bahadur Shastri. They never expected him to open up the front and go to Lahore,” he said. Also Read – 2019 most peaceful festive season for J&K: Jitendra Singh “And then they were surprised. They had thought that he will be only fighting in Kashmir… They were surprised. In the Kargil conflict, they were again surprised. They never expected us to pull all our forces and get our Bofors guns and get the Air Force into it and take them out,” the IAF chief said. “So they have always miscalculated. Even now, after Pulwama (terror attack) happened, I think they had miscalculated, thinking that our political leadership will not permit such a (Balakot-like) strike. It is not that our Air Force is not capable. They (Pakistan) know what our capability is. But they were always under the impression that our leadership will not (act),” he said. Also Read – Personal life needs to be respected: Cong on reports of Rahul’s visit abroad In February this year, India carried out air strikes across the LoC and destroyed terror camps in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province inside Pakistan. The strikes involving several fighter jets destroyed camps belonging to Pakistan-based terror outfits in Balakot. Air Chief Marshal Dhanoa, PVSM, AVSM, YSM, VM, ADC is the 25th IAF chief and assumed the post in December 2016 after Air Chief Marshal Arup Raha retired. Air Chief Marshal Dhanoa will be succeeded by Air Marshal RKS Bhadauria, who was named as the next IAF chief recently.last_img read more

Moscow Russian President Vladimir Putin on Wednes

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first_imgMoscow: Russian President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday defended Donald Trump over accusations the US leader pressured Kiev to dig up dirt on a rival, saying there was “nothing compromising” in transcripts of the call. “I see nothing compromising in the conversation between Trump and (Ukrainian leader Volodymyr) Zelensky,” Putin said of the phone call that has sparked an impeachment probe in the US. “President Trump turned to a colleague with a request to investigate possible corruption relating to members of the former administration,” the Russian leader said at an energy forum in Moscow. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince Salman ‘snubbed’ Pak PM Imran, recalled his private jet from US: Report”Any head of state would have had to do the same.” “They have already been using any excuse to attack President Trump. Now it’s Ukraine,” Putin added. Putin also took aim at the Mueller Report, which concluded that Russia tried to swing the 2016 election in the Republican’s favour but did not establish evidence of collusion between the Trump camp and Moscow. “He didn’t find any evidence of us colluding with Trump in the past, but said there was a risk we might do so in the future… It would be funny if it weren’t so sad,” said Putin. Also Read – Iraq military admits ‘excessive force’ used in deadly protestsAsked if Russia would try to meddle in the US 2020 presidential election, Putin joked: “I’ll let you into a secret — yes! We absolutely will… Just don’t tell anybody.” The White House last week released a transcript of a call this summer between Trump and a recently elected Zelensky. It showed that Trump asked Zelensky to probe Democratic rival Joe Biden, and the Democrats are looking into whether Trump used a delayed 400 million (365.8 million euros) aid package as leverage. Ukraine is fighting an ongoing war in its east against Russia-backed separatists, which broke out after Moscow’s annexation of Crimea in 2014.last_img read more

Gurugram Congress on Thursday appointed Sukhbir K

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first_imgGurugram: Congress on Thursday appointed Sukhbir Kataria as the nominee from Gurugram’s seat. Kataria had won this seat in 2009 as an independent candidate. He later joined the Hooda cabinet as the Sports Minister and since then he is believed to be close to the former Chief Minister. In a major relief for the former MLA in May this year a Gurugram court has set aside criminal charges against him. Kataria was accused of indulging in bogus voting and creating fake voter identity cards to allegedly influence the elections in 2009. Also Read – More good air days in Delhi due to Centre’s steps: JavadekarAttacking BJP, Kataria said, “The BJP has not performed work and is involved wonder. Now to shrug off their responsibilities they are not giving tickets to the members and denying tickets.” Speaking of his vision for Gurugram Kataria said, “Due to poor policies of the government Gurugram has become one of the most polluted cities in the world. Even the posh areas in the city you can see potholed roads. The deterioration of the city is due to the corruption.” Also Read – Union min Hardeep Singh Puri, Delhi L-G lay foundation stones for various projects in DwarkaIn an interesting move by the Congress, the younger brother of Rao Narbir Singh Kamal Yadav has been appointed as the nominee. His elder brother Rao Narbir who is the senior minister in BJP was denied ticket this time in these elections. In Pataudi, Congress has fielded Sudhir Chaudhury while in Sohna the party has fielded Shamsudin. Both of them had represented the party even in 2014. Gurugram has been a stronghold of Congress party that has won this seat for six out of twelve times the assembly elections have been held in the city. Interestingly in the first elections that were held in Gurgaon then in 1967 was won by a candidate from Jan Sangh, a political organization that ultimately gave way to BJP, a party which was formed in 1980. Thakran defeated his rival Kanhaiya Lal from Congress. In the coming years, the grand old party of India was able to win the Gurugon seat in the years 1968, 1972,1982,1991, 1996 and 2005. Dharambir Gaba and Rao Mahabeer Singh are the two most successful leaders from Congress. While Gaba has won the Gurugram seat four times Rao Mahabeer has won the seat two times.last_img read more