‘Taking Christmas’ on Labor Day

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first_img You Might Like ‘Dance with the one that brought you’ There’s a saying, “Dance with the one that brought you.” I think it applies to college sports, as well as… read more By Secrets Revealed Sponsored Content Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Book Nook to reopen Next UpI “took Christmas” myself on Labor Day. But it wasn’t the kind of taking that came after a tiring morning of cooking and entertaining kinfolks. I had been planning all week long to “take Christmas” on the last holiday of summer.I’m not a couch potato. I don’t even like television. I only watch it when I can’t find anything else to do.The world could come to an end and I wouldn’t know it if I was depending on the television to alert me. I have friends who stand ready to call me on my landline if aliens from outer space invade the Earth or the polar cap melts and Alabama is about to be washed into the Gulf of Mexico.But every now and then, when I don’t have anything better to do, I turn on the television and search for something worthy of watching.About six months ago, I found myself in that situation. As I “remoted,” from Channels 1 to 125, I happened upon “The Waltons.” I remembered seeing that show years ago and I remembered it was worth watching.As bad as I hate to say it, I got hooked. “Taking Christmas” wasn’t anything that my mama did very often.But, after we’d had a house full of company, especially on holidays, and the dinner dishes had all been washed, the kitchen cleaned up and the goodbyes and y’all comes had been said, Mama would sit down on the sofa and say, “Well, I’m fixin’ to take Christmas.”And she would be in for a well-deserved afternoon of rest. Published 11:00 pm Friday, September 7, 2012 Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Daycenter_img Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits This Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s… ‘Taking Christmas’ on Labor Day By Jaine Treadwell Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthMost 10 Rarest Skins for FortniteTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel “The Waltons” come on Channel 20 weeknights at 7 o’clock and again at 8 o’clock. I try to arrange or disarrange my schedule to include at least one episode. I’ve given notice that I will not answer the telephone between the hours of 7 and 9 p.m. If it’s an emergency, call 911.What was so exciting about Labor Day and my plans to “take Christmas” was that there would be four episodes of “The Waltons” plus the “Walton Reunion” AND, at 1:30 p.m. there would be a showing of “Spencer’s Mountain,” which was the basis for the television series, “The Waltons” and it was filmed in the most heavenly place on earth, Wyoming’s Teton Mountains.And on top of all that, “Spencer’s Mountain” was filmed in the Grand Teton National Park during the summer of 1963 and when I was an employee of Yellowstone National Park. Every minute of the summer that I wasn’t changing beds and flushing toilets in tourist cabins was spent hiking and camping in Jackson Hole, the heart of the majestic Tetons.Jackson Hole was a 90-mile “hitch” from Yellowstone and the little tourist town of Jackson was a square of souvenir shops and saloons. Exercising our freedom and great “universal” experiences, we, the college savvy, summer park employees, chose the saloons over shopping.So did Hollywood movie star Henry Fonda, who was on location in Jackson. He was playing the father of the Spencer brood in “Spencer’s Mountain.”He was as old as most of our daddies but he sure didn’t act much like my daddy. He’d dance with all the girls and horse around with the boys. He was quite a card.But I was so much in awe of the beauty of the Grand Tetons, that movie stars had to take a backseat to Mother Nature.I don’t remember seeing “Spencer’s Mountain” when it came out and to the Pike Theater. I did see it as a mature adult quite a few years ago.But I was excited to sit back and “take Christmas” and see it again on Labor Day, sandwiched between episodes of “The Waltons.” Once again, I was young and back camping along the Snake River and resting my eyes on the majestic Grand Teton Mountains.I’ve had a lot of Christmases in my life and every one has been very special. I’ve had the pleasure of just that many Labor Days but I don’t remember any one being special except the one when I, like Mama, “took Christmas.” Latest Stories Email the author Print Articlelast_img read more

Kling: Teller of lingering stories

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first_imgLatest Stories Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Print Article Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Kling: Teller of lingering stories By Jaine Treadwell Next UpIf living in Minnesota isn’t interesting enough, Kling is somewhat of a modern day hobo. He’s hopped freight trains and ridden the rails from coast to coast. He’s been hit by lightning and lived to tell about it and fished more ice holes than everybody south of the Mason-Dixon Line.To say that Kevin Kling is one heck of a storyteller would be an understatement, said Annette Bryan, a member of the sponsoring Brundidge Historical Society’s storytelling committee.“Kevin has been a featured teller at our festival twice and we’ve had to wait three years to be able to get him back,” she said. “But he’s worth the wait.” Kevin Kling is best known for his popular commentaries on NPR’s “All Things Considered” and for his storytelling stage shows. He has performed all across the United States and abroad, in Europe, Australia and Thailand.He has been called part funny guy, part poet and playwright and part wise man. Add to that, one of the most entertaining and versatile storytellers in the country and that would be Kevin Kling in a nutshell.His stories are often hilarious and sometimes tender but always memorable.Kling had built his storytelling career on telling strong sense-of-place stories but, after surviving a near-fatal motorcycle crash, his tales have moved from hilarious nostalgia to something weightier and more spiritual. By The Penny Hoardercenter_img The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Email the author You Might Like Tax help: Volunteers offer free tax prep to elderly, those in need Free income tax preparation services are available to people and families in the Pike County area who are making less… read more Sponsored Content Book Nook to reopen Published 3:00 am Friday, January 29, 2016 Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration “Long after the storytelling festivals end, those of us who have had the good fortune hear Kevin will remember him and his stories,” Bryan said. “He connects with his audiences. He’s like a old best friend that has suddenly come back into your life and is eager to fill you in on all that has happened to him over the years.”The Pike Piddles Storytelling Festival opens tonight with a sold-out performance at the We Piddle Around Theater and will continue with three storytelling concerts at the Trojan Center Theater on the campus of Troy University. Tickets are available for the 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. concerts at $10 each. The 2 p.m. concert is sold out.Tickets are available at The Messenger or may be reserved by calling 334-685-5524 or 670-6302.All concerts feature pre-show music 30 minutes prior to the storytelling concerts and stories by all four tellers. Different stories are told at each concert.The Pike Piddlers Storytelling Festival is sponsored in part by the Alabama State Council on the Arts with support by the National Endowment for the Arts. Anybody who lives in Minnesota on purpose must be some kind of interesting fellow.And, Kevin Kling is just about as interesting a fellow as anyone can be.“When you freeze paradise, it lasts longer,” said Kling who will be a featured teller at the Pike Piddles Storytelling Festival this weekend in Brundidge and Troy.last_img read more