Mourinho wants Real Madrid return

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first_imgRelatedPosts EPL: Son fires four past Southampton Bale completes Tottenham return from Real Madrid Tottenham sign £25m Sergio Reguilon Jose Mourinho is eyeing a sensational return to Real Madrid with Florentino Perez considering him the best replacement for Zinedine Zidane.The Portuguese has been out of work since December when his tumultuous reign at Manchester United was finally brought to an end.He has since taken a prominent role as a TV pundit but has not hidden his desire to return to a dugout as soon as possible.And, according to The Sunday Times, he is said to be very keen on a return to the Bernabeu if the Spanish giants decided to part company with Zidane.The Frenchman is struggling to rediscover the form that made his first spell at Real so successful. He has won just half of his matches since coming back towards the end of last season.It is claimed that Perez, Real’s president, has already lined up Mourinho as Zidane’s replacement if things do not improve.Mourinho is reported to consider the Real job as one that closely matches his ambitions. He only wants to manage a team that can compete for major honours.It is well known that some of the Real players are against the idea of bringing Mourinho back. However, it is claimed the strength of the former Chelsea boss’ relationship with Perez would settle any complications.Perez reportedly wants a coach with a strong tactical philosophy who can instill discipline into the playing staff as they look to knock Barcelona off their perch at the summit of La Liga.The 56-year-old managed the Spanish giants between 2010 and 2013 and secured a famous La Liga title win over Barcelona in 2012.While he was eventually ousted after three failures to win the Champions League, Mourinho recently admitted it was his ‘best memory’ in football.“Real Madrid was my best experience because of what I learned as a coach, as a man, for the lessons that I took in my career and in my life. It is the best memory of my career, it was fantastic,” Mourinho told Portuguese TV, as reported by Marca.“What they asked me at Real Madrid was within my nature. They told me that we had the best team in the world on the other side (Barcelona), that they were crushing us and we had to reverse the situation.“We had to prevent Barca from crushing us and that’s why the Mestalla Cup final is the most important.“From there nothing was the same. We won La LIga, the Super Cup, but nothing was like the cup final and I unfortunately failed to win the three Champions League semi-finals.” Tags: Fiorentino PerezJose MourinhoLa LigaReal MadridSantiago BernabeuZinedine Zidanelast_img read more

What channel is Chiefs vs. Steelers on today? Time, TV schedule for 2019 NFL preseason

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first_imgMORE: Watch Chiefs vs. Steelers live with fuboTV (7-day free trial)On the other side of the ball, all eyes in Pittsburgh will be on Devin Bush. The rookie linebacker recorded an absurd 10 tackles in the Steelers’ preseason opener last week. Another solid performance against the Chiefs will fuel the optimism around a player from whom Pittsburgh needs an immediate impact in order to meet its defensive goals this season.The Chiefs position battle to watch Saturday night in Pittsburgh is Darwin Thompson vs. Damien Williams at running back. Chances are Kansas City will proceed with a committee approach at the position this season, but Thompson has come on unexpectedly strong to eat into Williams’ projected snaps.Below is all the info you need to watch Chiefs vs. Steelers on Saturday, including the TV channels nationally, in Kansas City and in Pittsburgh.What channel is Chiefs vs. Steelers on today?TV channel (National): NFL NetworkTV channel (Kansas City): KCTVTV channel (Pittsburgh): KDKALive stream: fuboTVWith its 7:30 p.m. ET start time, Chiefs vs. Steelers gets the spotlight as the second nationally televised NFL game of the day on Saturday as part of a triple-header on NFL Network. It’s one of eight Week 2 NFL preseason games scheduled to be played in front of a national audience.Locally, the TV channel for Chiefs vs. Steelers in Kansas City will be KCTV. In Pittsburgh, the game can be seen on KDKA. Chiefs vs. Steelers is one of a handful of games on the NFL preseason schedule we wish would be played in the regular season. These teams won’t meet again in 2019 unless they see each other in the AFC playoffs, so we’ll have to get our fix of Patrick Mahomes vs. Ben Roethlisberger in Week 2 of the NFL preseason.It won’t be a large serving, as the Kansas City and Pittsburgh starters will only play a series or two, but it will at least be an actual serving. Roethlisberger and other key Steelers No. 1s are expected to make their preseason debuts against the Chiefs, giving us our first look at Pittsburgh’s starting offense without Antonio Brown. As for a live-stream presentation, Chiefs vs. Steelers can be seen on fuboTV. New fubo TV users can sign up with a seven-day free trial. All nationally televised NFL preseason games will be available on fuboTV.Chiefs vs. Steelers: What time is kickoff?Date: Saturday, Aug. 17Start time: 7:30 p.m. ETChiefs vs. Steelers is the second game of a Saturday triple-header on NFL Network.Browns vs. Colts will begin the triple-header at 4 p.m. ET. After Chiefs vs. Steelers at 7:30 p.m. ET, the night cap will be Cowboys vs. Rams in Hawaii, which will begin at 10 p.m. ET.Chiefs preseason schedule 2019DateOpponentTimeAug. 10vs. Bengals8 p.m. ETAug. 17at Steelers7:30 p.m. ETAug. 24vs. 49ers8 p.m. ETAug. 29at Packers8 p.m. ETSteelers preseason schedule 2019DateOpponentTimeAug. 9vs. Buccaneers7:30 p.m. ETAug. 17vs. Chiefs7:30 p.m. ETAug. 25at Titans8 p.m. ETAug. 29at Panthers7 p.m. ETlast_img read more

Surveys show damage on Letterkenny air quality still being caused by coal burning

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first_imgA survey has revealed that the burning of coal in Letterkenny and its environs is still having a major effect on air quality.Graphs which were taken from the Letterkenny Air Quality station, show a two week period in June and a two week period in mid-October.The results show there were no breaches of either limit during the two weeks in June, (left hand side), while the change to colder autumn weather around mid October has seen 7 breaches of the PM10 limit and 12 breaches of the PM2.5 limit over two weekends. These breaches are linked to the burning of fossil fuels because the influence of traffic is expected to be much reduced at weekends.Now that we have entered the heating season, Donegal County Council is reminding householders in the Letterkenny and environs area that there is a ban on the burning of Smoky Coal.With real time air quality information at our fingertips on www.donegalcoco.ie the public can see the impacts that burning smoky coal is having on the air quality in Letterkenny. The Environmental Protection Agency manages the national ambient air quality monitoring network and, in association with Donegal County Council, installed and commissioned the air quality station in Letterkenny in May 2019.This station now provides automated, provisional results for Particulate matter (PM 10, PM2.5) and Sulfur Dioxide (SO2).In Donegal, Particulate matter (PM 10, PM2.5) coming from the burning of solid fuel for home heating is the main cause of poor air quality and it impacts on health through disorders of the heart and lungs.Dr Laura Heavey, Specialist Registrar in Public Health Medicine, says, “the smoky coal ban is a really positive initiative to improve the health of people in Donegal. We know that air pollution increases symptoms and hospital admissions for those with asthma, COPD and other lung diseases. It can also trigger heart attacks and strokes, through damage to the blood vessel walls.“New reports from the World Health Organisation are now linking long term exposure to air pollution to other health issues, like dementia, Parkinson’s disease and neuro-developmental disorders in children. Air pollution has also been linked to poor pregnancy outcomes, such as low birth weight babies” explains Dr. Heavey.She adds “Dublin city imposed a smoky coal ban back in 1990. Dr Luke Clancy, a respiratory physician in Dublin, has calculated that the ban saved 369 lives per year in Dublin, based on rates of heart and lung disease before and after the ban. If everyone in Letterkenny complies with the ban, we could see a similar impact here on the health of people in Donegal.” Suzanne Bogan, Waste Awareness Officer with Donegal County Council is urging householders to use longer-lasting low smoke fuels over the winter months.She said “You can make a difference over the winter burning season by using longer lasting low smoke fuels, such as low smoke coal or wood, kindling, fire logs, fire starter logs; or turf or turf products.“If using low smoke coal make sure that the bags are clearly labelled low smoke coal, smokeless fuel or approved fuel.”Householders are obliged to comply with the smoky coal ban when burning fuel and should discuss the many different types of low smoke fuels that are available with their local coal merchant. The other key part of this legislation is that coal retailers and coal merchants are not permitted to market, sell or distribute smoky coal inside the ban area. Donegal County Council will be working with the Revenue Commissioners, in a multi-agency enforcement initiative, focusing on the coal retail / merchant sector. This will involve the inspection of delivery lorries and new legislation has also made provision for fixed penalty notices for breaches of the legislation within the coal sector ranging from €250 – €1,000.“It is important to remember that the sole purpose of this law is to deliver cleaner air” says Suzanne Bogan and “it is only through the continued support of householders, coal retailers and merchants that improvements in air quality will continue”.For more information or to report a breach of the law contact Donegal County Council on 074 9153900 or visit www.donegalcoco.ie or visit www.dccae.gov.ie .Surveys show damage on Letterkenny air quality still being caused by coal burning was last modified: November 25th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:bancoalcouncilletterkennysmokylast_img read more

Monday’s QPR quiz

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first_imgOh dear, Rangers fans. Today is definitely not the time to tease you with another tricky QPR quiz, so here’s a gentle one for you to stroll through on this difficult Monday.[wp-simple-survey-16]Click here for Friday’s QPR quizFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

Injured 49ers get cutest get-well messages from Joe Staley’s young daughter

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first_imgThere’s a lot to like about these 49ers. Not only are they unbeaten on the field, but they’re unrivaled in cute get-well messages to injured players.Reporters listening to injured 49ers tackle Mike McGlinchey on Wednesday describe his frustration over missing a game for the first time in his career couldn’t help but notice the adorable picture behind him.#49ers Mike McGlinchey is talking but all I can do is look and appreciate the get-well card on his locker, courtesy of Joe Staley’s …last_img read more

Paper View:  A Geology Paradigm Suffers a Paradox

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first_imgA pair of geologists found a paradox in a paradigm.  That paradigm is the belief that ancient ocean levels rose and fell in cycles as ice sheets retreated and advanced, and the cause of the cycles was periodic changes in earth’s orbit.  They modeled this process and couldn’t get it to work.  They couldn’t get the sea level to rise as high as the evidence shows it did.  And it would have required enormously high fluctuations in atmospheric carbon dioxide to get rid of the ice sheets each time.Horton and Poulsen [U of Michigan, Ann Arbor], writing in Geology,1 called their paper the “Paradox of late Paleozoic glacioeustasy.”  Time out for definitions: eustasy refers to global sea levels as measured from a static reference (like the center of the earth); glacioeustasy is, by extension, the global sea level during ice ages.  In theory, the earth’s cyclic orbital variations over long time scales2 force ice ages to advance and retreat.  In the Paleozoic, when the land terrain was generally lower, large ice sheets could form and melt over vast areas, producing cyclothems, or sedimentary deposits alternating between strata buried under water (subaqueous) and under air (subaerial).  Sounds plausible, but how accurate is this picture scientifically?  How well is it understood?  After all, Horton and Poulsen began by saying that this paradigm has been used to explain our planet’s past: “Models of Euramerican cyclothem deposition invoke orbitally driven glacioeustasy to explain widespread cyclic marine and nonmarine late Paleozoic sedimentary sequences.”  Presumably, a geologist doesn’t just want to catalog the rocks, but explain how they got that way.Things get messy real quick when fitting the field data into the paradigm.  It appears global sea levels would have had to alternate by 100 meters or more to produce the beds.  Their model, however, couldn’t get the water to rise more than 25m.  And only by adjusting the model with enormous fluctuations in atmospheric carbon dioxide could they get the ice sheets to melt away.  “These results present a potential paradox: while our model is able to simulate widespread Gondwanan glaciation, it is unable to reproduce significant orbitally driven glacioeustatic fluctuations without very large magnitude carbon cycle perturbations.”Their Introduction describes the paradigm: from 326 to 267 million years ago (mya), conditions “primed the late Paleozoic paleoenvironment for glaciation.”3  The continents were joined into a supercontinent called Gondwana, and carbon dioxide levels were low.  Ice sheets formed and grew when orbital changes cooled the atmosphere; they retreated when warm times returned.  “The ice sheets of Gondwana left not only direct geological evidence of continental glaciation, but also indirect sedimentary signatures of their waxing and waning,” they said.  The presence of North American deposits that appear cyclic “has been used to infer that late Paleozoic depositional environments were largely controlled by glacioeustasy.”  If that is the explanation, though, the fluctuations in global sea level were very large: up to 200m – much larger than the inches or feet that alarmists of global warming warn us about today.  Can sea level changes of that magnitude be forced by orbital cycles?  That’s what Horton and Poulsen wanted to find out.  Remember, the plausibility of a hypothesis has nothing to do with its credibility, and vice versa.  Science wants to run the numbers.The next section of the paper described the methods and results of their model.  A global model, of course, requires dependence on other models, like “at atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) … coupled to a three-dimensional ice sheet model.”  They also had to rely on models of topographic elevations of a continent – Gondwana – that no longer exists.4  And, they played with carbon dioxide levels “consistent with proxy estimates.”  The growth and extent of the resulting ice sheets reflected the level of atmospheric CO2 as expected, but they couldn’t get it to melt except at the higher concentrations.  They said “increases in excess of 2000 ppm were required to cause substantial melting of Gondwanan ice sheets.”  (Note: current levels are about 384 ppm amidst all the hubbub about global warming.)  In addition, the causative factors seemed inadequate.  “The dynamic response of continental ice sheet volume to our prescribed transient orbital insolation variations is modest,” they said.  That means that orbital forcing does not have that great an effect.  It certainly did not produce global sea level rises of 100 meters or more.  And it contradicts other studies that claim to find correlations between recent ice ages and orbital periods, like a recent paper in Science.5  (See summary on Science Daily).In their discussion and conclusions, they evaluated possible resolutions of the paradox.  Perhaps “Orbital changes were linked to the carbon cycle through a positive feedback” like they believe was operative during the greener Pleistocene epoch.  Even so, the model required extreme concentrations of carbon dioxide to get the ice sheets to retreat completely between cycles (ablation).  But what in nature would generate such high concentrations in the Paleozoic?Our simulation of late Paleozoic glacial conditions presents a paradox.  While our simulation of large (>100 m sea-level equivalent) continental ice sheets is in good agreement with sedimentological evidence of Gondwanan glaciation, our orbitally driven ice-volume changes are ~10 m, much smaller than the late Paleozoic glacioeustatic variations implied by both cyclothems and isotopic analyses.  The absence of significant continental-scale ice sheet ablation in the face of changing orbital insolation poses a significant challenge to our current understanding of late Paleozoic ice sheet dynamics.More bad news.  What does this do to the more recent Pleistocene glacioeustasy theory?  It was supposed to be better understood because ice core data admittedly shows some agreement with orbital and atmospheric factors.6  But even here, “The cause of Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles is still debated,” they said, “but is generally thought to be due to a combination of orbitally controlled insolation forcing and greenhouse gas fluctuations.”  But those are the same factors used for the Paleozoic model.  They didn’t work there.  How do we know the same factors would produce Pleistocene cycles?To save the Paleozoic paradigm, they appealed to ignorance.  “Unlike the Pleistocene, late Paleozoic pCO2 levels are not well constrained.”  Maybe somehow the levels fluctuated wildly back then; “however, the temporal resolution of this record remains coarse,” so there is no way to know with any accuracy.  “Furthermore, a mechanism by which atmospheric pCO2 concentrations could repeatedly fluctuate by ~2000 ppm over orbital time scales is not known.”  Methane clathrates under the sea could discharge a great deal of greenhouse gas quickly; “However, the long recharge rate of clathrates would prevent repeated discharges on orbital time scales.”  So that idea is no help.  Is it possible that the sea levels rose and fell independent of carbon dioxide concentrations?  An “energy balance model” (EBM) reproduced the cycles, they noted.  But then they discounted it:Simulations using an energy balance model (EBM) coupled to an ice sheet model indicate that orbital insolation variations alone can produce repeated ~100 m sea-level fluctuations (Hyde et al., 1999).  We cannot say with certainty why our results differ from those using an EBM; however, we suspect that differences in the paleoboundary conditions and/or the treatment of ablation and precipitation rates in the calculation of mass balance over the ice sheet might be responsible.  For example, unlike our model where precipitation over Gondwana is explicitly calculated, EBM precipitation rates are based on prescribed modern precipitation rates (Hyde et al., 1999). Predictions of equilibrium ice sheets made using GCM ice sheet models with fixed (nontransient) orbital conditions have also been used to infer large late Paleozoic glacioeustatic fluctuations (of as much as 245 m; Horton et al., 2007).  However, our new results indicate that these estimates are too large.  The reason is straightforward: in the fixed-orbit experiments, there is no preexisting ice sheet to influence the final mass balance.  In contrast, in our transient experiments, the preexisting ice sheet (simulated during the previous orbital step) has a substantial influence on local conditions due to temperature-elevation and ice-albedo feedbacks.  Orbitally driven insolation changes are not large enough to overcome these local ice sheet effects; consequently, orbital changes produce only small ice-volume fluctuations.Time to assess the situation.  Horton and Poulsen believe they experimented with a reasonable model, but they could not replicate the paradigm.  This may “have potential implications for the late Paleozoic climate system and for ice sheet dynamics in general.”  Maybe the model is the problem.  Any model has limitations; it is only a simulation of a process in which multiple factors interact in complex ways.  Still, if there were an orbital signature, it should appear in the simulation.  Their main obstacle was getting rid of the ice sheets once they formed (in some runs, the ice sheets reached the latitudes of modern-day Buenos Aires).  The Pleistocene paradigm invokes additional processes to get rid of the ice quickly between cycles: including “subglacial sediment destabilization (MacAyeal, 1993; Clark and Pollard, 1998), reorganization of the ocean’s thermohaline circulation (Maslin et al., 2001), and the removal of coastal sea-ice buttressing (Rignot and Thomas, 2002).”  Future runs including those factors may have better luck.  But there’s a disturbing alternative interpretation: “Alternatively, our lack of large glacioeustatic change could also indicate that the Pleistocene Northern Hemisphere glacial-interglacial cycles may not be a good analogue for late Paleozoic glaciation.”  The two epochs are not comparable, in other words.  This has a more disturbing side effect: “in which case non-uniformitarian processes (e.g., very large perturbations of the carbon cycle) may have driven late Paleozoic glacioeustatic fluctuations.”  To rework a phrase: the (almost-present) Pleistocene was not the key to the past Paleozoic.Here’s the upshot: they found a paradox, and couldn’t resolve it.  This undercuts a paradigm that was thought to be fairly well understood.  They only explanation left was non-uniformitarian – something that runs against the grain of the whole science of geology.  It reduces to the Stuff Happens Law (09/15/2008).  The consequences are enormous, but the solution lies in the nebulous future: “The resolution of this late Paleozoic paradox is fundamental for understanding the processes that drive glacioeustatic cyclicity and late Paleozoic climate change (Poulsen et al., 2007; Peyser and Poulsen, 2008), and is relevant to our current understanding of the climate-cryosphere system.”This can only imply one thing: jargon and math and computer skills notwithstanding, geologists, planetary scientists and atmospheric scientists understand very little of this at all.  Politicians should take note.1.  Daniel E. Horton and Christopher J. Poulsen, “Paradox of late Paleozoic glacioeustasy,” Geology, August 2009, v. 37 no. 8 p. 715-718, doi: 10.1130/G30016A.1.2.  These include rates of precession, obliquity, and eccentricity that can combine into long-term cyclic fluctuations.  Presumably, this affects insolation (the amount and angle of sunlight hitting the land masses) and therefore the climate, although other non-orbital factors could be involved (e.g., volcanic outgassing).3.  These glacial cycles are different from those in the Pleistocene when mountains were much higher.4.  Skeptics might ask if this hypothetical continent really did exist, if its existence is model-dependent on the interpretation of the very cyclic deposits examined in this paper.5.  Clark et al, “The Last Glacial Maximum,” Science, 7 August 2009: Vol. 325. no. 5941, pp. 710-714, DOI: 10.1126/science.1172873. 6.  See 02/05/2008 and 08/08/2006 about whether orbital forcing mechanisms match the geological record.Time for a refresher course on our Guide to Evolution (e.g., a list of Murphy’s Laws).  The First Law of Scientific Progress and Maier’s Law are, as you can see, not just jokes, but standard ways of doing business in the halls of academia.  Getting grants, writing computer models, and publishing them in scientific journals is all fine and good, but when the ultimate explanation is Stuff Happens, are we any better off?  When the authors throw up their hands and task future researchers with the obligation to figure this out, has our understanding of Planet Earth increased?  When the answer is Stuff Happens, and we don’t know why it happens, what is the probability the answer is outside the box?Unbeknown to these two well-meaning modelers, they just handed a gift to the young-earth creationists (may their memory be forever Expelled – obligatory curse).  They admitted that uniformitarianism might be inadequate.  And they revealed that no known combination of present processes can account for the field data.  Maybe it’s time to resurrect the forbidden theory of Directed Catastrophism.(Visited 48 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Essential Premiere Pro Plugins Under $200

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first_imgThese essential Premiere Pro plugins can help you increase productivity without breaking the bank.Top image from Red Giant SoftwarePremiere Pro CC is a powerful NLE that’s steadily gaining traction within the Hollywood system. It’s being used to cut films like The Aviator, Hugo, and Gone Girl. While Premiere Pro is beginning to carve out a niche within feature-film editing, it’s also making a name for itself with independent and documentary filmmakers. Cop Car was one such production that relied on Premiere Pro and its flexibility.No matter what project you’re working on, you want to maximize your turnaround time as much as possible. One way to do this is to utilize the vast array of available plugins for the software. Let’s take a look at some essential — and affordable — Premiere Pro plugins.1. Magic Bullet Colorista IIIRed Giant has several Premiere Pro plugins, but one of their best options has to be Magic Bullet Colorista III. By utilizing this plugin, editors can really fine tune their color correction right in Premiere. By adding the power of Colorista to the built-in color workflows in Premiere, you should have everything you need to make your feature of video project look as professional as possible.Price: $199Video from Red Giant2. Denoiser II vs NeatVideoRed Giant also has another plugin called Denoiser II, which is a part of the Magic Bullet Suite. Denoiser reduces the grain or noise that appears in your footage. Now, Denoiser isn’t the only option to help with this. There’s also Neat Video, which is more than capable of cleaning footage. Let’s check out this video from Film Riot that pits both Premiere Pro plugins against each other in a battle royale.Price: Denoiser IU – $99, Neat Video – $99 Video from Film Riot3. FilmConvertAre you a purest? Do you want that old school film grain in your footage to warm it up? Well then FilmConvert has you covered. Their Premiere Pro plugin allows an editor to adjust the film grain for a classic look. They don’t stop with just the grain — you can also make color adjustments to match your favorite film styles.Price: $199 (Adobe Plugins)Video from Andyax4. GBDeFlickerAre you capturing timelapse video? Do you need a way to fix the flickering problem that comes from working with timelapse? Then check out the Granite Bay Premiere Pro plugin GBDeFlicker. If you’re working on a PC, be sure to check out their other plugin GBTimelapse, which helps editors enhance and smooth timelapse video sequences.Price: $99Video from tlapse5. PHYX KeyerAre the keying options in Premiere not enough for you? Well, then check out this Premiere Pro plugin. PHYX Keyer isn’t just one incredibly powerful plugin. It’s ten plugins rolled into one. Easily remove green or blue screens within Premiere Pro without having to head over After Effects.Price: $49Video from FxFactory Plugins for Final Cut Pro, Premiere Pro, AE and Motion6. PluralEyesOnce again Red Giant has developed a must-have Premiere Pro plugin with the development of PluralEyes. Most video or film productions record dual system audio. When it comes time to put the project together, the editor needs to sync the audio and video together. This is where PluralEyes comes in. Check out the video below on exactly how to use PluralEyes with Premiere.Price: $199Video from Web Video Chefs7. Essentials 3 From NewBlueFXThe multiple Premiere Pro plugins offered by NewBlueFX and their Essentials 3 package are pretty astounding. The Essentials 3 Ultimate package turns Premiere Pro into a swiss army knife post-production tool. Having a set of plugins like this only increases your turnaround time, which is a great thing for any editor out there.Price: Basic – $99, Elite – $299, Ultimate – $399Video from NewBlueFX8. After EffectsHands down the best plugin that’s really a non-plugin for Premiere Pro is After Effects. With Adobe’s move to link their Creative Cloud together, After Effects has effectively become the very best plugin for Premiere Pro. Having the ability to send timeline clips directly from Premiere to After Effects allows editors to expand their creative palette.If you’re a veteran of Premiere Pro, but have little to no experience with After Effects, join our very own Mikey Borup as he runs us through the fundamentals of the post-production software.Price: Included with subscription to Creative CloudWhat are your thoughts on our plugin list? Are we missing any must-have plugins for Premiere Pro? Give us your thoughts in the comments below.last_img read more

Child deaths in Bihar: Advanced life-support ambulances pressed into service

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first_imgIn view of the rising incidents of deaths due to Acute Encephalitis Syndrome/Japanese Encephalitis (AES/JE) in Muzaffarpur and adjoining areas in Bihar, Union Health Minister Harsh Vardhan has issued instructions for deployment of eight advanced life-support (ALS) ambulances in the affected districts. Accordingly, eight additional ALS ambulances were pressed into service for transportation of critical patients under the National Health Mission (NHM), a statement issued by the Health Ministry said. The Central teams comprising 10 paediatricians and five paramedics each had started working on the ground, in coordination with the State government, it added. The teams were sent to Bihar on Wednesday. Mr. Vardhan further informed that 16 senior district officials and medical personnel were sent to the vulnerable blocks for monitoring and early identification of cases and ensuring daily reporting. Their headquarters were also shifted to these blocks, he said, adding that the district Collector was involved in the process now and was personally taking responsibility for the same. The Collector had deputed senior deputy collectors (SDCs) or district-level officers to lead various block teams, Mr. Vardhan was quoted in the statement as saying. These teams would be assisted by a district-level medical officer and a medical officer in-charge (MOIC) to do the overall work at the block level, the statement said. It added that the authorities in Bihar were given instructions to switch to daily surveillance and monitoring for detecting early warning signs of the disease. “The State government has started a social audit, along with an active case-finding campaign through a house-to-house survey, and is moving the prospective patients to the nearest Public Health Centre (PHC) for early intervention. Surprise checks are also being conducted at the PHCs by SDCs. “Additionally, the early morning inspection of anganwadi centres is also being undertaken by SDCs and child development project officers (CDPOs). They are also giving Oral Rehydration Solution (ORS) to each house in the affected villages,” the statement said. The auxiliary nurse midwives (ANMs) and accredited social health activists (ASHAs) were directed to visit every house to raise awareness on AES/JE by distributing pamphlets and brochures, it said, adding that awareness was also being created through other measures such as announcements through microphones and inter-personal communication. Also, a team of experts from the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) was deployed at the Sri Krishna Medical College and Hospital (SKMCH) in Muzaffarpur for making the virology laboratory operational at the earliest, Mr. Vardhan was quoted as saying in the statement. He added that the multi-disciplinary team deployed earlier was reviewing all the case records of the AES patients admitted to the hospital in 2019. “The team is reviewing the case records of discharged and deceased AES patients at SKMCH, using a standardised tool to know the reasons for mortality. We expect to complete the activity in the next two to three days. A similar exercise will be undertaken at the Kejriwal Hospital,” the Union Health Minister said. The multi-disciplinary team will systematically collect clinical, nutritional and epidemiological information from the AES patients hospitalised since May 18. Blood, urine and CSF samples will be collected from these patients to rule out infectious aetiology. It would also carry out a case-control study (by taking household/village controls) to reconfirm the role of missing meals and litchi consumption (including the quantity), the statement said. Orientation training of all paediatricians of SKMCH will also be conducted in batches over the next few days on clinical case management and the treatment protocol of AES and the new teams will be briefed about case assessment, investigations and the treatment protocols already in place. They would also be requested to continue with the same, the statement said.last_img read more

10 months agoBournemouth midfielder Nnamdi Ofoborh happy with new deal

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first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Bournemouth midfielder Nnamdi Ofoborh happy with new dealby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBournemouth midfielder Nnamdi Ofoborh admits he’s happy to have signed a new deal.The 19-year-old, who signed his first professional deal with the club last summer, has earned a new contract which will keep him at Vitality Stadium until 2021.The Cherries’ Young Player of the Season for 2017/18 said: “Coming to the club three years ago this is a real positive for me and I feel great being here.”I’m really happy, my family is really happy and I just want to keep moving forward from this point on.”I found out just before an under-21s game, the gaffer called me into his office and wanted to speak to me, I was a little bit nervous to be fair I didn’t know what he wanted to say!”I thought he wanted to talk about the game or something else I’m not sure! But I was over the moon, he’s a great manager and coach, he helps me with everything I need to work on.”I need to work and listen to all of the coaching staff to make me a better player for the future.”I want to stay consistent, hopefully be listening to all the coaches at the club I can kick on and my aim is to stay in and around the first team fold.” last_img read more

22 days agoMan Utd boss Solskjaer: We’re working on goalscoring

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first_imgMan Utd boss Solskjaer: We’re working on goalscoringby Paul Vegas22 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has revealed he works on every aspect of football in his training sessions.Solskjaer is under pressure to keep his job after a poor start to the season, which sees United lay in tenth on the Premier League table with nine points from seven games.Speaking ahead of Thursday’s clash with AZ Alkmaar in the Europa League, Solskjaer said: “We work on the whole game.”Defending, attacking, scoring goals. You see these players in training and you see the quality. You hope it’s going to be one of these feel-good nights.”It creates a lot of confidence when you score. It’s your job to criticise or praise. It’s our job to just always focus on the next one and scoring goals is the most difficult part in the game of football.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more