Madras High Court Disposes DMK’s Plea Seeking CCTV Coverage Of Voting; Appreciates ECI For Clearing All Apprehensions

By

first_imgNews UpdatesMadras High Court Disposes DMK’s Plea Seeking CCTV Coverage Of Voting; Appreciates ECI For Clearing All Apprehensions LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK1 April 2021 10:10 PMShare This – xThe Election Commission of India recently gave an account of the measures being taken by it to ensure that the upcoming by-elections in Tamilnadu are free and fair The development comes in a petition filed by the Dravida Munnetara Kazhagam party before the Madras High Court apprehending tampering of EVMs and unfair counting. The Election Commission has informed a Division Bench…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Election Commission of India recently gave an account of the measures being taken by it to ensure that the upcoming by-elections in Tamilnadu are free and fair The development comes in a petition filed by the Dravida Munnetara Kazhagam party before the Madras High Court apprehending tampering of EVMs and unfair counting. The Election Commission has informed a Division Bench of Chief Justice Sanjib Banerjee and Justice Senthilkumar Ramamoorthy that it has identified critical and vulnerable booths and that 100% web-casting of the entire activities on polling day shall be done thereof. The ECI also submitted: There will be 100% web-casting of the entire activities on polling day at the critical and vulnerable polling booths. Over 44,000 polling booths, covering more than 50% of the total polling stations in the State, would be covered by webcasting. However, the monitoring of the activities on the virtual platform will be undertaken only by the Election Commission officials and no outsider will be allowed to participate real time, though the recordings may be available for inspection subsequently.Information pertaining to identification of the critical and vulnerable polling booths should not be shared with political parties on the grounds of security.M3 voting machines would only be used, which have been manufactured in 2017 and later.Regarding counting of the paper trail, the random counting in accordance with the Supreme Court directions would be conducted.Pre-poll guarding of the EVMs would be conducted in accordance with the Election Manual. Towards this end, each EVM handed over to a polling booth is checked before the polling starts and only if it reveals nil votes, the machine will be used. Every EVM is sealed and the candidates’ signatures are obtained across the seal and the seals are not broken or opened till the period of limitation after the conduct of the polls runs out and no challenge to the election in the relevant constituency has been made. Significantly, the Petitioner-party had also sought installation of jammers at the strong rooms where EVMs are stored to ensure that they are not tampered with remotely. On this issue, the Election Commission submitted that the EVMs cannot be tampered by any wi-fi or radio device. It added, “it is also its practice to cut off supply inside the strong-rooms where the EVMs are stored, both at the pre-poll and at the post-poll stages, not because the machines are affected by any electrical activity, but to ensure that there is no cause for fire by any short-circuit of the lines.” In light of the above submissions, the Bench recorded its satisfaction and disposed of the petition with hope that the election week, starting April 6 will pass off peacefully and uneventfully. The order stated, “the counter-affidavit filed by the Election Commission and the specific replies to the queries raised by the Court apropos the areas of concern expressed by the petitioner, indicate a satisfactory level of preparedness on the part of the Election Commission that should dispel all apprehensions and even allay legitimate misgivings. … However, the Election Commission should be alert and pro-active and, most importantly, ensure that the second surge of the pandemic is not accelerated by the activities undertaken on election day.” The Bench also appreciated the Commission for filing a proper counter-affidavit that demonstrated a kind of clarity not generally associated with affidavits filed by the officialdom. Case Title: Dravida Munnetara Kazhagam v. Election Commission of India & Anr. Click Here To Download Order Read OrderNext Storylast_img read more

USA: Navy Reduces Costs While Refurbishing Deep-Dive Rigs

By

first_img Share this article USA: Navy Reduces Costs While Refurbishing Deep-Dive Rigs Training & Education Back to overview,Home naval-today USA: Navy Reduces Costs While Refurbishing Deep-Dive Rigs The U.S. Navy achieved successful open-water validation dives July 2012 on MK 16 MOD 1 Underwater Breathing Apparatus’ (UBA) electronic circuitry to extend service life into the next decade for a world-class unique diving rig capable of extreme depths in open sea water.Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division (NSWC PCD) Diving and Life Support Functional Area Manager Wes Hughson credited NAVSEA’s Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) and Naval Special Warfare (NSW) sponsors for having the foresight to stand up the Diving and Life Support Depot (DLSD) at Panama City in 2009. NSWC PCD is a field activity for the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA), the largest single business activity in the Navy and one of the largest business establishments in the federal government.“For example, from June 2011 through June 2012, with the Navy’s centralization and stand up of the DLSD at NSWC PCD, the repair and cleaning improvements helped achieve significant savings. It was equivalent to approximately two and one quarter Man Year’s worth of savings for the U.S. Navy,” Hughson said.NSWC PCD Commanding Officer Capt. Scott Pratt explained the diving rig’s mission and safety requirements are what make this such a significant accomplishment.“Particularly its mission’s safety requirements,” Pratt said. “When we’re putting a diver at depth, there is absolutely no room for mechanical or electrical failures in the rig’s architecture. And to date, the Navy’s Tradeoff Analysis has not found any manufacturer able to replicate the MK 16 MOD 1 UBA as safely as our DLSD can. Nor has industry been able to demonstrate the cost savings we’re achieving.”“NAVSEA Supervisor of Salvage and Diving also realizes significant total ownership cost savings for the EOD and NSW program sponsors,” said NSWC PCD Equipment Specialist Dave Junker.Project Engineer Terry Adams said this upgrade marked the completion of two and a half years of development, testing and fabrication of the new electronic control suite for the UBA.“This electronic upgrade will allow continued use of the MK 16 MOD 1 UBA for an additional 10 years,” Adams said. “Not only does this provide a service life extension, but it also ensures sufficient spares to fabricate additional UBA platforms. Had this program not been successful, the Navy would have been forced to outsource for an alternate UBA at great expense in time and dollars to the U.S. government.”According to Hughson, by establishing NSWC PCD as the current MK 16 and Viper Depot several economies are realized by co-locating engineering, acquisition and depot-level functions together.“EOD’s and NSW’s organizational analysis, which utilized an objective third party, determined that co-locating a depot with its associated in-service engineering activities would capitalize on in-house expertise, streamline business processes and help protect the MK 16 MOD 1 UBA from obsolescence issues,” Hughson said.“For example, having these functional facilities centralized empowers NSWC PCD with the ability to rebuild or repair a depot item, which prevents us from having to purchase a new item. Also, locating the depot with NSWC PCD’s inventory minimizes expenses with the logistics delay when materials are located elsewhere, Hughson said.Pratt added by partnering with neighboring tenant command, Navy Experimental Diving Unit (NEDU), the DLSD is able to achieve cost avoidances as well.“Our DLSD’s partnership with NEDU adds to our ability to repair and oxygen clean items in one central location. This helps us avoid sending parts off base for cleaning, reducing logistics delay time and man hours spent,” Pratt said.“This type of direct Fleet support shortens the repair and cleaning process to less than two weeks, which significantly increases Fleet readiness and system availability,” Hughson added, “a significant saving to the taxpayer.”[mappress]Naval Today Staff, August 14, 2012 View post tag: costs View post tag: Deep-Dive August 14, 2012 View post tag: while View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Navy View post tag: Refurbishing View post tag: Naval View post tag: Rigs View post tag: reduceslast_img read more

The Bielemas get some #karma of their own

By

first_imgFormer Wisconsin football head coach Bret Bielema took a tumble as he walked into the stadium where his new team, Arkansas, was preparing to play Texas A&M Saturday. The slip came exactly two weeks after Bielema’s wife tweeted “#karma” just moments after Wisconsin’s bizarre loss to Arizona State Sept. 14. The video quickly went viral.Full video below:last_img

CAF Confed Cup: Enyimba Departs for Jo’burg

By

first_imgThe contingent was in high spirit ahead of the game, with the players in particular, relishing the challenge of making names for themselves on the continent.Meanwhile, Enyimba midfielder, Bartholomew Ibenegbu, believes the club is capable of beating South Africa’s Bidvest Wits in Friday’s CAF Confederations playoffs first leg clash.“We know it will be a difficult game because Bidvest Wits are a top club in South Africa, but I think we can still go into it with plenty of confidence to win,” Ibenegbu told CSN.“It will be a big game and an opportunity for us to go out there and show how good we can be, especially against top opposition like Bidvest Wits.”Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Enyimba Football Club left Lagos wednesday for Johannesburg, South Africa to honour the first leg of the CAF Confederation Cup Round of 16 tie with Bidvest Wits.The two-time African champions were drawn against the reigning South African PSL champions in last month’s draw in Cairo, and will play the first leg at the Milpark Stadium in Johannesburg on Friday, April 6.The team comprised of 18 players and the technical crew departed the Murtala Mohammed International Airport, Lagos last night.last_img read more

Photo library: Infrastructure 3

By

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Infrastructure contact sheet (1.1MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Johannesburg, Gauteng province: The Nelson Mandela Bridge crosses the Johannesburg Station shunting yards, linking the business districts of Braamfontein and Newtown. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Trains in the shunting yards of Johannesburg Station. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: The Nelson Mandela Bridge connects Braamfontein and Newtown in the city centre. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: The Hillbrow Tower, the property of telecommunications parastatal Telkom, is one of the tallest towers in Africa – and the symbol of the city. To its right is the massive Ponte apartment building. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Joubert Park minibus taxi rank, in the east of the city centre. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: The Braamfontein skyline seen from across the Johannesburg Station shunting yards. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: The Nelson Mandela Bridge connects Braamfontein and Newtown in the city centre. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Early morning winter mist across freight containers waiting to be unloaded at the Alrode rail depot. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Early morning winter mist across freight containers waiting to be unloaded at the rail depot in Alrode. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image INFRASTRUCTURE 3: {loadposition infrastructure}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about using the image library? Email Mary Alexander at [email protected]last_img read more

Zuma hotline goes live

By

first_imgThe presidential hotline is buzzing, withover 2 000 calls an hour recorded on thefirst day. (Image: The Presidency) MEDIA CONTACTS • Vusi MonaDeputy director-general, communications+27 76 682 0079RELATED ARTICLES• Zuma: a more prosperous nation • State of the nation address• Presidency talks to children• Farmers give Zuma thumbs-upJanine ErasmusPresident Jacob Zuma’s much-anticipated hotline went live on 14 September 2009, enabling members of the public to direct government-related complaints or queries straight to his office.The toll-free hotline number is 17737. This will take callers to a Union Buildings-based call centre, which will be open from 7.30am to 10pm, Monday to Friday. Citizens can also fax the call centre on 086 681 0987.Vusi Mona, former City Press editor and now deputy director-general for communications in the Presidency, said that a shift system was in the pipeline, which would extend the hours.While calls from landlines are free, it is unclear whether callers from mobile phones will be charged, as government and mobile providers are still in negotiations.During the first few hours of operation, the call centre reported an average of around 2 400 calls per hour.Efficient serviceThe R4-million service, which will reportedly cost about R1.5-million a year to run, is fronted by 43 public liaison officers. All officers have received specific training in dealing with general enquiries from the public, questions about the government and service delivery complaints.Each government department and province has been assigned its own public liaison officer, who is expected to attend to all issues efficiently and quickly, and to follow up enquiries and complaints received.Eventually it is expected that each provincial government will implement its own hotline.“The provinces are expected to create a forum that includes liaison officers for each municipality,” said the Presidency in a statement, “so that the service is taken to local government level, including rural municipalities and districts.”Zuma has indicated that he may even take a few calls himself, if his schedule permits. The president’s office will be linked to an online platform that will enable him to take calls directly.On the first day of operation, the president did indeed answer one or two calls personally. He spoke to a widow from the Eastern Cape who was battling to access her late husband’s pension, and a resident of Benoni in Gauteng with a complaint about consistent sewerage leakage.“Government has always communicated with the public before, including through izimbizo,” said Zuma, addressing hotline staff. “We are now taking that interaction a step further, through ensuring that there is two way communication. We want people to be able to tell us what their problems are with service delivery, so that we can assist directly.”Zuma urged operatives to always remain cool and collected, even with angry callers at the other end of the line, adding that they would solve many problems through just being human. He called on them, as the first line of government communications, to help improve government’s image.Language no barrierCallers will be served in their language of choice. South Africa has 11 official languages, and the country’s Constitution states that everyone has the right to use their chosen language in any activity and at any time. The National Language Service of the Department of Arts and Culture is responsible for projects and policies that promote the use of all South Africa’s languages.Former music star Eugene Mthethwa, of the moderately successful kwaito group Trompies, is in charge of the hotline. Mthethwa is the newly appointed deputy director for public liaison and stakeholder management.“This is a way for people to get closer to government, and to express their dissatisfaction with poor service delivery,” said Mthethwa. “We take these matters very seriously.”All hotline calls will be recorded and logged to enable the Presidency to monitor and evaluate the quality of service offered, as well as determine the time taken to deal with complaints. Records will also help staff obtain important statistics to improve performance, such as which government departments receive the most – or the least – complaints.A more interactive government“In this era of renewal, we will move towards a more interactive government,” said Zuma in his maiden State of the Nation speech on 3 June 2009. “To lead by example, work has begun on the establishment of a public liaison capacity in the Presidency. In addition to receiving letters and emails from the public, we will also establish a hotline for easier access.”Zuma went on to assure the country that hotline staff will treat each query as if it was the only one, and would track its progress until it arrived at the person who would handle it properly.Now is the time for Zuma to make good on that promise. The Presidency said it expects around 1 500 calls per day.With the service up and running, said the Presidency, it will spend the next few weeks fine-tuning the system and eliminating any bugs so that it will be fully functional by the end of September.The Presidency also said it hopes the hotline would prompt government departments to remember that they are there to serve the people, and to develop a culture of putting the citizen first.Offering renewed hopeAccording to Vusi Mona, the hotline was a cause close to the president’s heart.Mona also admitted that the fact that hotline exists at all is a sign of failure in service delivery. He added that the hotline would give renewed hope to disgruntled citizens who struggled with “inaccessible government services”.Queries or comments? Contact Janine Erasmus at [email protected]last_img read more

South African indie artist tackles homophobia

By

first_imgObie Mavuso is tackling homophobia head-on through her events company Queers on Smash. (Image and Video: Redbull Amaphiko)A seasoned indie musician and filmmaker from Cape Town is taking on gender inequalities in arts and entertainment by bringing together members of the LGBTI community to talk about their experiences.Obie Mavuso founded Queers on Smash, which she describes as “a queer and unorthodox lifestyle company offering fun and inclusive queer spaces”.At the core of her work is a desire to create a place where queer people can party, talk and hangout without all the discrimination that society projects onto LGBTI – lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex – people.First eventIn April, Queers on Smash hosted its first blacks-only queer social event in Cape Town.“The response was amazing,” said Mavuso. “A lot of people came up to me on the day and told me they were happy to be at the social. That was the main point for me. It wasn’t really about me, but for people like myself. We needed a space where we could feel safe and belong.”At the event, they discussed what it means to be black and queer in Cape Town.Author and stage actress Buhle Ngaba gave a talk about her recently released book Girl Without A Sound, which is a fairytale written specifically for black girls.The 25-year-old also co-founded Jam That Session with fellow musician Andy Mkosi – a creative platform that showcases up and coming creative practitioners.“Art’s always been about personal expression for me,” said Mavuso in an interview with Redbull Amaphiko. “I just want to make a positive change through my art and shift people’s mindsets.”Next month, Queers on Smash will be hosting another blacks-only queer social in Johannesburg.last_img read more

North Carolina Sentinel Landscapes – Building Capacity While Promoting Conservation & National Defense

By

first_imgBackground: Sentinel Landscapes are places where preserving the working and rural character of our private lands is important for both national defense and conservation priorities. Rural working forest, agriculture, and other land uses can provide many important public benefits: watershed protection; habitat for species of conservation concern; opportunities for outdoor recreation; open space and wildland preservation; biodiversity protection; commodity production; and the maintenance of a rural way of life. In addition to those benefits, certain working and natural lands are also situated geographically to protect the military mission from incompatible development. Through the Sentinel Landscapes partnership, the Parties will work together in overlapping priority areas near military installations to help landowners make improvements to the land that benefit their operations, enhance wildlife habitat, and enable the Department of Defense training missions to continue.1. Please tell us a little bit about yourself, how long you’ve been involved with the project, and anything else you’d like to share.I have been involved with conservation easements and the NCDA&CS Agricultural Development and Farmland Preservation Trust Fund since 2005.  Building the relationship with the military services in NC has been ongoing for approximately 10 years.  North Carolina Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler has been the instrumental in these efforts to establish the North Carolina Sentinel Landscapes. The Eastern North Carolina Sentinel Landscape designation has been an ongoing objective since its conception in 2013.  See attached federal MOU between USDA, DOD REPI, and Interior.  The North Carolina effort is rooted back to 2009 based upon a Working Lands MOU for North Carolina.  See attached  Final Working Lands Partnership Agreement for details.2. Can you provide a brief overview of the mission of NC Sentinel Landscapes?“Sentinel Landscapes are working or natural lands important to the Nation’s defense mission – places where preserving the working and rural character of key landscapes strengthens the economies of farms, ranches, and forests; conserves habitat and natural resources; and protects vital test and training missions conducted on those military installations that anchor such landscapes.” 3.  There are many stakeholders in this project, what are the biggest challenges of collaborating with so many organizations?The most difficult issues are communication to all partners and keeping all partners in focus with objective or mission due to the diversity of partners.  See below chart of the many partners involved with ENCSL.  There is a continuous change in partners due to needs and resources to address the objectives set forth by the partnership.  The partnership is in the process of another change with the recent passage of NC Senate Bill 131 which established in state law the “North Carolina Sentinel Landscapes Committee”. See below legislation.ESTABLISH NORTH CAROLINA SENTINEL LANDSCAPES COMMITTEESECTION 3.19.(a) Committee Established. – There is established the North Carolina Sentinel Landscape Committee (Committee).SECTION 3.19.(b) Findings and Purpose. – The General Assembly finds that sentinel landscapes are places where preserving the working and rural character of the State’s private lands is important for both national defense and conservation priorities. It is the intent of the General Assembly to direct the Committee to coordinate the overlapping priority areas in the vicinity of and where testing and training occur near or adjacent to major military installations, as that term is defined in G.S. 143-215.115, or other areas of strategic benefit to national defense. Further, the Committee shall assist landowners in improving their land to benefit their operations and enhance wildlife habitats while furthering the State’s vested economic interest in preserving, maintaining, and sustaining land uses that are compatible with military activities at major military installations and National Guard facilities. In its work, the Committee shall develop and implement programs and strategies that (i) protect working lands in the vicinity of and where testing and training occur near or adjacent to major military installations or other areas of strategic benefit to national defense, (ii) address restrictions that inhibit military testing and training, and (iii) forestall incompatible development in the vicinity of and where testing and training occur near or adjacent to military installations or other areas of strategic benefit to national defense.SECTION 3.19.(c) Powers and Duties. – The Committee shall:Recognize all lands in the State as sentinel landscapes areas that are so designated by the United States Department of Defense.Identify and designate certain additional lands to be contained in the sentinel landscapes of this State that are of particular import to the nation’s defense and in the vicinity of and where testing and training occur on, near, or adjacent to major military installations or are of other strategic benefit to the nation’s defense. In this work, the Committee may seek advice and recommendations from stakeholders who have experience in this sort of identification and designation.In designating sentinel lands as directed by subdivision (1) of this subsection, the Committee shall evaluate all working or natural lands that the Committee identifies as contributing to the long-term sustainability of the military missions conducted in this State. In its evaluation of which lands to designate as sentinel lands, the Committee shall consult with and seek input from: Today we had the opportunity to interview Dewitt Hardee, the Farmland Preservation Director for the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services overseeing the NC Agricultural Development & Farmland Preservation Trust Fund. Dewitt spoke to us about North Carolina Sentinel Landscapes, a land preservation program focused on conservation of working and rural lands, as well as promoting national defense. Dewitt was able to answer some questions about the challenges and benefits of working as part of a large collaborative effort to build capacity within the state of North Carolina.  The United States Department of Defense.The North Carolina Commander’s Council.The United States Department of Agriculture.The United States Department of the Interior.Elected officials from units of local government located in the vicinity of and where testing and training occur on the proposed sentinel lands.Any other stakeholders that the Committee deems appropriate. Develop recommendations to encourage landowners located within the sentinel landscape designated pursuant to subdivision (1) of this subsection to voluntarily participate in and begin or continue land uses compatible with the United States Department of Defense operations in this State.Provide technical support services and assistance to landowners who voluntarily participate in the sentinel landscape program.SECTION 3.19.(d) Membership. – The Committee shall consist of at least the five following members:The Commissioner of Agriculture, or the Commissioner’s designee.The Secretary of the Department of Military and Veterans Affairs, or the Secretary’s designee.The Secretary of Natural and Cultural Resources, or the Secretary’s designee.The Executive Director of the Wildlife Resources Commission, or the Executive Director’s designee.The Dean of the College of Natural Resources at North Carolina State University, or the Dean’s designee.The Commissioner of Agriculture or the Commissioner’s designee shall serve as Committee chair for an initial two-year term. Thereafter, the Committee chair shall be one of the five listed members above. The Committee chair may appoint members representing other State agencies, local government officials, and nongovernmental organizations that are experienced in land management activities within sentinel lands.SECTION 3.19.(e) Transaction of Business. – The Committee shall meet, at a minimum, at least once during each calendar quarter and at other times at the call of the chair. A majority of members of the Committee shall constitute a quorum. The first Committee meeting shall take place within 30 days of the effective date of this act.SECTION 3.19.(f) Reports. – The Committee shall report on its activities conducted to implement this section, including any findings, recommendations, and legislative proposals, to the North Carolina Military Affairs Commission and the Agriculture and Forestry Awareness Study Commission beginning September 1, 2017, and annually thereafter, until such time as the Committee completes its work.SECTION 3.19.(g) Administrative Assistance. – All clerical and other services required by the Committee shall be supplied by the membership and shall be provided with funds available.4. What are some of the benefits of working with the military installations in NC?The largest benefit is the collaborative teamwork and use of resources from North Carolina’s 2 largest industries and employers.From the 2016 announcement of the Sentinel Landscape designation. Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler announces the designation of 33 counties as the North Carolina Sentinel Landscape. The announcement took place at Cherry Research Farm in Goldsboro.“Agriculture and the military are the top two economic sectors in North Carolina. According to Dr. Mike Walden, Reynolds Distinguished Professor and Extension Economist at NC State University, agriculture and agribusiness is the number one industry sector in North Carolina. The total economic impact of agriculture and agribusiness is $84 billion, or more than 17 percent ofCol. Michael Scalise, deputy commander of Marine Corps Installations East, talks about the military’s partnership with North Carolina as Commissioner Troxler looks on.the gross state product. The North Carolina Department of Commerce produced a comprehensive study on the $66 billion economic impact of the military on the state’s economy, and in a report to the General Assembly in 2016, then-Secretary of Military and Veterans Affairs Cornell Wilson presented this information, stating that the military is the “second largest sector of the economy” in North Carolina, and the state has the fourth largest military presence in the United States.  These economic statistics underscore the need for partnerships between military installations, federal departments, state agencies, local governments and non-profit partners that support North Carolina’s top two industry sectors.”5. What do you see as the most impactful accomplishments of this designation to date?The recognition by both the public and private entities the importance and compatibility of military training and agriculture / forestry on the same land parcels.  This recognition allowed the many partnerships to work collectively for a common good that supports North Carolina’s two top industries.6.  North Carolina Sentinel Landscapes has many initiatives, can you share one or two success stories?Collaboration and development of a working relationship among a multitude of partners that had previously considered each other adversaries i.e. EDF and production agriculture / forestry.The creation of The “ NORTH CAROLINA SENTINEL LANDSCAPES COMMITTEE” into state law by the passage of NC Senate Bill 131The rewarding of the 2017 REPI Challenge grant of $9.2 million to Eastern North Carolina Sentinel Landscapes.  See attached document from REPI.7. How does the NC Sentinel Landscapes utilize the resources of the land grant system: North Carolina State University and North Carolina State Extension?North Carolina State University and the Extension Service are partners.  Their resources and personnel are used as other partnership resources  for the collective purpose of the Sentinel Landscapes.  All partners are expected to participate and provide their respective strengths to further the mission.8.  Is there any advice you would give to other organizations looking to take on a project of this size?Be patient, listen to your partners, and draw upon the strengths of each partner.  No one partner can accomplish the mission on its own.  But collectively, the mission can be accomplished with a greater and more positive end result.  Be willing to compromise and share in credit or failure.center_img We’d like to thank Hardee Dewitt and the North Carolina Sentinel Landscapes team for taking the time to answer our questions and share their experience with us. For more information about this designation, visit the links below:https://sentinellandscapes.wordpress.ncsu.edu/http://www.ncadfp.org/index.htmOther ResourcesFinal Working Lands Partnership Agreement 2 7-7-09ADFP REPI and Sentinel Landscapes Fact Sheet *All images present in this article were used with the permission of the North Carolina Sentinel Landscapes team.last_img read more

10 months ago​Chelsea boss Sarri urges Hazard to end transfer speculation

22 days agoMan Utd boss Solskjaer: We’re working on goalscoring

By

first_imgMan Utd boss Solskjaer: We’re working on goalscoringby Paul Vegas22 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has revealed he works on every aspect of football in his training sessions.Solskjaer is under pressure to keep his job after a poor start to the season, which sees United lay in tenth on the Premier League table with nine points from seven games.Speaking ahead of Thursday’s clash with AZ Alkmaar in the Europa League, Solskjaer said: “We work on the whole game.”Defending, attacking, scoring goals. You see these players in training and you see the quality. You hope it’s going to be one of these feel-good nights.”It creates a lot of confidence when you score. It’s your job to criticise or praise. It’s our job to just always focus on the next one and scoring goals is the most difficult part in the game of football.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more